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Weirdest Eats in Asia

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#235
Avatar of smartexpat smartexpat
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As a self-proclaimed ‘foodie’, I’ve always pride myself at being able to stomach almost anything – I’m talking Turtle Soup, Pig’s Brains, Fried Ants etc.

I’d love if we could share some weird eats, where to find them, how they taste like (!?), pictures, anything!

February 17, 2012 at 1:10 am
#236
Avatar of cherylt cherylt
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Hi! Another foodie here :)

These are some of the more adventurous foods I’ve tried:
- Grilled snail at a Taiwan roadside stall: didn’t taste good at all…
- Smelly tofu: this should be well-known. China, Hong Kong, Taiwan are a few of the places you can find it. I think it smells and tastes like a public toilet, urgh! Don’t understand how anyone can like this!
- Crocodile meat in Thailand: a scary eat, but tastes all right. A little on the tough side though.
- Kangaroo meat in Australia: Loved this! Had a strong taste but otherwise was just like any regular red meat.
- Turtle soup in Singapore: pretty good, was a little slimy but the soup was tasty.
- Pig blood, chilled and coagulated, in Malaysia: texture was jelly-like, but the taste and smell was repulsive… It’s apparently a delicacy though.

The hardest thing about weird eats for me is probably feeling bad and sympathetic for the animal. :(

Cheryl

February 17, 2012 at 1:22 am
#244
Avatar of rossExpert ross
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February 18, 2012 at 8:22 pm
#268
Avatar of Michelle Schusterman michelleschusterman
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Interesting stuff, guys!

I’ve had turtle soup in New Orleans – tasty tasty.

Live conch at the beach in South Korea – chewy.

Kangaroo paté, elk tartare, and grilled seal in Québéc City. The first was spicy, the second was weirdly sweet (but good), the last was just not for me. Extremely gamey and chewy.

Cow hooves in Salvador, Brazil. I wish I could remember the name of the specific dish – it’s AMAZING. Really fatty, though – a few bites and you’re full. I’m pretty sure it uses palm oil. If anyone knows what dish I’m talking about, refresh me por favor!

What were the brains like? That’s one thing I’ve never had the opportunity to try. I feel like the texture would put me off, but I’d like to try it.

February 19, 2012 at 10:36 pm
#302
Avatar of cherylt cherylt
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Wow, Michelle.. Cow hooves sounds pretty interesting. It’s surprising because it sounds like it will be hard and chewy instead of being fatty! :P How was it cooked? Braised, fried, etc?

Here’s another list of weird eats in Asia: http://www.sojourns.com.sg/blog/asia/top-5-strangest-eats-in-asia/ (not sure if I’m allowed to post such links here, but do look at it if you can!) It mentions Balut and Bat, just like Ross’s links did.

Is it just me or does Asia have the weirdest eats ever in the world?! Other parts of the world seem generally tamer…

Cheryl

February 21, 2012 at 11:26 pm
#305
Avatar of lizzzstomania lizzzstomania
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Mhmm Balut~

I’m kidding. I actually got quite freaked out looking at the pictures on the site Cheryl posted – though I heard Balut is actually really nutritious (and a good aphrodisiac!).

I myself have tried a fair bit of well, weird food.
- Turtle Soup (not from New Orleans – I didn’t know they had turtle soup there!): This one is a Chinese-style Turtle Soup that you can get around Singapore. The soup is actually really good and cooked with XO. Mhmm~
- Pig’s Brains: Texture is kinda soft and mushy, tastes like how most offal would. But the thought of putting brains into your mouth might put some people off.
- Chicken’s heart (sounds ironic) but yeah, chewy. I had it with Chicken Rice which is a local favourite here and the Chicken hearts were served on the side. Chewy, not much of a taste or maybe it was how they cooked it?

We’re such bold eaters! :)

Liz

February 22, 2012 at 1:28 am
#362
Avatar of Mike newedge24
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Bundaegae – South Korea, It’s a popular snack along street corners and also served as a complimentary snack in a few restaurants. It’s silk worm larvae. Don’t much care for the taste myself honestly, very bitter. Worth a try though.

Chicken feet – Exactly what it sounds like. Also in South Korea. Taste pretty good. Usually, they are served in a spicy red sauce, so beware when eating them and have water handy. They tend to be crunchy as there is cartilage in each foot.

Mok Dang (might have the spelling off) – It’s pig’s intestines. Served in South Korea, it carries the look of intestines, lol. It’s not bad though. Chewy, but otherwise tastes like any other meat.

Octopus – I don’t remember what it’s called here in Korea, but there is a type of octopus that is served alive (more or less). It is cut up while still alive, and then drenched in oils. I haven’t had the chance to try it yet, but its supposed to be pretty good. Though, there is some danger to it as if the tentacles are not covered in enough oil, then they will grab to the inside of your throat presenting a suffocation hazard. People have died from eating it before, though it’s not common.

February 29, 2012 at 12:36 am
#456
Avatar of Manila CitizenExpert mutyang
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Hi smartexpat,

Here are some from the Philippines:

1. Balut (has been featured in Fear Factor for its, well, fear-provoking moments before eating) – It’s a duck fetus
2. Betamax – It can be chicken or pig intestines
3. Isaw – Grilled pig blood that looks like chocolate bars :)

There are more, but that’s enough for your place for now. =)

Hope to see you visit us here to eat these!

March 8, 2012 at 8:25 pm
#483
Avatar of itournepal itournepal
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Intestine, lungs, liver and other inner parts of stomach of goat and water buffalo make a delicious cuisine in Nepal. These are preferred more to flesh and makes all time snacks as well as main course.
Rautes (ethnic group) still living in forests of west Nepal, hunt monkeys and welcomes honored guests.
Tharus of Southern Nepal, eat mouse. It is believed that this gave them resistant against Malaria that caused most of other ethnic groups to flee tropical region.

http://www.itournepal.com

March 11, 2012 at 9:53 pm
#536
Avatar of cherylt cherylt
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hi newedge24,

“Octopus – I don’t remember what it’s called here in Korea, but there is a type of octopus that is served alive (more or less). It is cut up while still alive, and then drenched in oils. I haven’t had the chance to try it yet, but its supposed to be pretty good. Though, there is some danger to it as if the tentacles are not covered in enough oil, then they will grab to the inside of your throat presenting a suffocation hazard. People have died from eating it before, though it’s not common.”
I’ve heard about this dish before! Also I’ve seen Youtube videos of the tentacles wriggling on plates before people quickly chew on them and swallow. Very cool and thrilling. :)

March 25, 2012 at 9:22 pm
#661
Avatar of ritchelleExpert ritchelle
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@mutyang – I think you got the betamax and isaw switched up. ;)
That said, let’s not forget adidas (named after the shoe brand), which is really just chicken feet, but usually goes with betamax and isaw. They’re popular street foods in the Philippines, and great to pair with the local beer. :D

May 20, 2012 at 2:53 pm
#788
Avatar of jhoalmadenExpert jhoalmaden
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Wow really interesting topic!

Among those adidas (chicken feet), isaw (intestines), betamax (blood jelly) and balut (duck’s fetus). In Cebu (Philippines), we have cow’s or water buffalo’s testicles stewed and we call it Lansiao. Roughly chopped testicles with tomato sauce, herbs and spices. They said it is an aphrodisiac but didn’t affect me at all. We also have Lingua (goat or cow’s tongue) and Balbacua (water buffalo’s outer skin without the hair) cooked just like the Lansiao.

In Australia, aside from the kangaroo steak, I have tried crocodile. It was so yummy. I think it was stir- fried or something similar way.

I think, if the dish is well-seasoned with right amount and combination of spices and proper exposure to heat, it will come out ok.

July 20, 2012 at 5:41 am
#1022
Avatar of
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I tried balut, but it won that battle. I’ve tried a bunch of other domesticated pets as well, but those were neither here nor there. The worst for me is still durian, even after trying it in three different forms. Yet, you can certainly find it frozen in a New York City Chinatown, and there have been signs for a balut competition, so that takes away a bit of the fun (from this thread).

December 23, 2012 at 9:19 am
#1086
Avatar of samanthaortac samanthaortac
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How about Century egg with bean curd. It’s called century egg although the preserving process of the egg only takes about 30 days! I tried it in Taiwan and you can see my pics below. I didn’t try Balut yet but have heard plenty abut it!

http://www.dontworryjusttravel.com/index.php/en/component/content/article/3-rss/87-culinary-expedition-to-taiwan.html

February 21, 2013 at 12:11 am
#1174
Avatar of geckovillaExpert geckovilla
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If you visit Thailand you will be aware of local delicacies such as fried grasshoppers or bugs, and may have tried our favorite, which is freshly prepared cow’s amniotic sack…it makes a delicious soup!

, or how about ant egg soup?

April 29, 2013 at 2:47 am

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