Photo courtesy of Redington

Somewhere not too far from the village of Chittenango, New York is one of the world’s perfect streams.

TO GET TO THE BEST STRETCH, park to the side of a muddy road, slog down half mile of snowed-over trail, slide down a bank disguised by a six-foot snow drift, link arms with your partner for a crossing that tests both weight and wit, tip-toe across a bar that slams pea gravel into boot crannies, and weave through a felled sugar maple while dodging stobs.

The water there rushes cellophane-clear over stony shallows and rides through deep, slow bends. Football-sized brown trout and rainbows are there — little brookies, too. And a few fishermen whose icicled beards and heavy catches flash like polished badges.

That water is so cold it burns exposed skin like fire. Let a set of waders leak and when the trickle hits the angler’s bottom, he’ll be off squealing in a high-stepping blur, breaking trail back to the pickup.

Photo by author

Waders have one job: keep water out. For years, anything more than dry was a luxury (though I dreamed of pockets). Waders were heavy, uncomfortable, sweaty, smelly, difficult to get into and out of, sometimes leaky, and generally tiresome — with a risk of drowning thrown in for good measure. Over time, waders have gotten lighter and more comfortable. Still today, even expensive waders can offer little more than dry.

Years ago, I fished that perfect stream in a borrowed pair of Redington waders. They kept me dry and kept me fishing until dark. So I had high hopes when a new pair of complimentary Redington Sonic-Pro Zip Front Waders arrived in the mail.

After a few weeks of heavy use, I can say they fish Texas-dry.

Getting into and out of waders is part of a wade angler’s rite of passage: you bundle up like Ralphie’s kid brother in A Christmas Story just in time to get hit with a coffee-thermos-inspired emergency. Your buddies stand around and chuckle as you grunt and stumble through an increasingly panicked, half-frozen wilderness burlesque.

With the front zipper on these waders, I can be in or out in seconds. I have to admit, I was more than a little skeptical about just how water proof a zipper could be. When I first used the waders I crept into the river, testing the zipper against the cold current an inch at a time. Even with the water lapping at my beltline, the RiRi Storm Waterproof Zipper and the 100% nylon DWR coated wader fabric do their job. They keep the water out.

And the zipper may well be a safety feature for any poor angler who finds his waders swamped. The shoulder straps are quick-release and adjustable for comfort.

I darted across a busy road, slipped down a half-manicured trail, stepped over a couple logs, hopped to and from a waist-high boulder, crouched to study the water, and climbed down into the shallows.

When I first stepped into these waders, I knew they were designed with fly anglers in mind. They have the pockets I’ve been looking for. The two exterior pockets are sealed with YKK water resistant zippers and offer the perfect storage spot for fly boxes and a small waterproof camera for quick evening trips when I don’t want to worry with a vest. The interior pocket offers a safe place for tissue, car keys, driver’s license, cash, and a fishing license. (Note: You have to unzip the front zipper to get to the interior pocket.)

The waders prove themselves on my walk in to fish. I darted across a busy road, slipped down a half-manicured trail, stepped over a couple logs, hopped to and from a waist-high boulder, crouched to study the water, and climbed down into the shallows. The waders were light, so I wasn’t fatigued. They breathed well, so I didn’t get sweaty.

The articulated legs are comfortable and allow a full range of motion. The stitchless seams are Ultra Sonic Welded and double taped, which makes them more comfortable and less likely to leak. The waders are constructed from a 3-layer material and are reinforced with 5-layer fabric for durability on the legs and bottom – durable enough that I could sit on a rock or walk a trail with a little more confidence. In case of a snag, repair material comes with each set.

A good deal of my fishing over the years has been done in graveled creeks. It’s my favorite way to fish. But those creek beds are full of Kamikaze pea gravel that attacks incessantly and somehow always gets deep into my wading boot. Once it’s wedged under my heel, I try to ignore it, keep casting, and wade down the creek on my tip toes.

But eventually I break down. I rip off my boot, bounce around on one foot, and dump the rocks. I get back to fishing. And within just a few hundred feet there’s another gravel attack. On it goes all day.

Photo courtesy of Redington

I’ve had no such problems with these waders. The gravel guards are an example of solid, thoughtful design that works. The cuff of fabric is drawn over the foot and clipped from the bottom of the waders onto the wading boot.

When it’s time to get the hook out of a fish’s mouth, my hemostats are conveniently clipped to one of two d-rings at the base the shoulder straps. It’s all adrenaline and ‘attaboys’ when I pull a keeper out of a winter current; but as soon as the hook is out, the wind turns my fingers into numb sausages. Now, after each catch, I can slip my hands into the micro-fleece hand warmers.

The waders allow plenty of room for layers, like a fly vest or a shell over top without impeding my range of motion. (Note: Poorly sized waders are no good. The booties can be too tight. Layering can be a problem. Consider getting a professional to help find the right size for you.)

The Sonic-Pro Zip Front Wader is Redington’s finest set of waders: light, easy to pack, care for, use, and store. $349.95 buys a whole lot of dry and a great deal of functional luxury for anglers fishing perfect streams anywhere. For those who are a little more cost sensitive, Redington’s Palix River Wader and Sonic-Pro Stocking Foot Wader offer fewer bells and whistles.