Photo by jspatchwork. Feature image by Bradstreet.
Who says you can’t have a farm in the backyard of your inner-city home? Urban homesteading is a lifestyle based on self-sufficiency, encouraging families to reduce consumption while engaging with nature on a deeper level, all from within the city.

URBAN HOMESTEADERS can grow their own food and stockpile it for the winter, raise chickens, and yield rainwater for household purposes. Some families even practice making homemade crafts, like soapmaking, and use solar energy to power their greenhouses.

While there are some obvious restrictions, like climate and lack of space, nearly any family can create a home-based economy.

Urban Homesteaders Are Nice People

Community connections are an important part of this lifestyle: one of the rules of being an urban homesteader is being a good neighbour. The Dervaes family from Pasadena, California, suggest in their 10 Elements of Urban Homesteading to always lend a hand for free. Additionally, events focusing on jam making, wine production and other home-based activities attract people of like-minds from all over.

Photo by david owen

Urban homesteaders are also always willing to share their knowledge. Dozens of blogs like the Urban Homesteader offer a wide variety of resources for being self-sufficient, including recipes and crop cultivation tips. Cool off with homemade naturally sweet tea? Don’t mind if I do.

No lie, converting your modern home to an urban homestead is a tough move — one that requires patience and time — but the long-term benefits of living green are outstanding. Organic foods are easy on the body and easy on the planet. Using bio-fuels, taking public transportation, and growing your own crops are huge money-savers.

Plus the workload encourages the whole family to participate, so drag the kids off the couch and have them tend the chicken coops.

COMMUNITY CONNECTION:

Have you created a urban homestead? Share your experiences in the comments.

Like this Article

Like Matador