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Two-and-a-half miles below the Antarctic surface, Lake Vostok, a fourteen-million-year-old lake sealed off from the rest of the world for eons, is about to be tapped into by Russian drillers. Having been completely isolated from Antarctica’s other subglacial lakes for such a long time, it’s also unique in that it contains about fifty times as much oxygen as the average lake.

Currently, the drill sits at nearly 300 feet above the lake. Read more here, or check out Matador’s own guide at penetrating Antarctica yourself.

 

 

About The Author

Jason Wire

Jason Wire graduated from Vanderbilt University in 2010 and spent the year after writing and teaching English in Spain. He's back in the states now, but doesn't know where. Follow him @wirejr.

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