VAPING MIGHT BE CONSIDERED TO BE A MORE ACCEPTABLE and healthy alternative than smoking traditional tobacco cigarettes, but recently presented research indicates that the substitute may be more harmful to the lungs and immune system.

The new information was explored last Friday at a conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C.

Ilona Jaspers, the Deputy Director of the UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma and Lung Biology, presented findings that suggest that e-cigarette significantly affects immune genes. She further demonstrated that the most significant immune modifier came from strongly cinnamon-flavored vape liquids. Jaspers concluded, although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration classify chemical flavoring as generally safe for consumption orally, it may not be as safe when inhaled.

The findings will be a concern for users who have moved off tobacco to a ‘healthier alternative’. There is an estimated 3.7 percent of American adults using electronic cigarettes on a regular basis. That figure represents more than 9 million adult consumers.

“Of course more studies need to be done in this area, because research especially in toxicology of e-cigarettes and their potential toxicity, the science is lagging behind the product manufacture, and we need to catch up in that area,” lead researcher Judith Zelikoff of NYU Langone Medical Center said in her closing statement in Washington.

E-cigs are still a relatively new product and their long-term effects aren’t yet clear. Researchers are thus calling for further toxicology research on the effects of vaping, considering the increase and range of available products on the market. Those considering stepping down from smoking tobacco might want to keep in mind that vaping is not a consequence-free smoke yet.

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