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Photo: Liz West

If we all start using them, these words can be resurrected.

DURING MY UNDERGRADUATE studies as a Linguistics major, one of the things that struck me most is the amazing fluidity of language. New words are created; older words go out of style. Words can change meaning over time, vowel sounds shift, consonants are lost or added and one word becomes another. Living languages refuse to be static.

The following words have sadly disappeared from modern English, but it’s easy to see how they could be incorporated into everyday conversation.

Words are from Erin McKean’s two-volume series: Weird and Wonderful Words and Totally Weird and Wonderful Words. Definitions have been quoted from the Oxford English Dictionary.

1. Jargogle

Verb trans. – “To confuse, jumble” – First of all this word is just fun to say in its various forms. John Locke used the word in a 1692 publication, writing “I fear, that the jumbling of those good and plausible Words in your Head..might a little jargogle your Thoughts…” I’m planning to use it next time my husband attempts to explain complicated Physics concepts to me for fun: “Seriously, I don’t need you to further jargogle my brain.”

2. Deliciate

Verb intr. – “To take one’s pleasure, enjoy oneself, revel, luxuriate” – Often I feel the word “enjoy” just isn’t enough to describe an experience, and “revel” tends to conjure up images of people dancing and spinning around in circles – at least in my head. “Deliciate” would be a welcome addition to the modern English vocabulary, as in “After dinner, we deliciated in chocolate cream pie.”

3. Corrade

Verb trans. – “To scrape together; to gather together from various sources” – I’m sure this wasn’t the original meaning of the word, but when I read the definition I immediately thought of copy-pasting. Any English teacher can picture what a corraded assignment looks like.

4. Kench

Verb intr. – “To laugh loudly” – This Middle English word sounds like it would do well in describing one of those times when you inadvertently laugh out loud while reading a text message in class and manage to thoroughly embarrass yourself.

Photo: Liz West

5. Ludibrious

Adj. – “Apt to be a subject of jest or mockery” – This word describes a person, thing or situation that is likely to be the butt of jokes. Use it when you want to sound justified in poking fun at someone. “How could I resist? He’s just so ludibrious.”

6. Sanguinolency

Noun – “Addiction to bloodshed” – Could be a useful word for history majors and gamers, as in “Genghis Khan was quite the sanguinolent fellow” or “Do you think spending six hours a day playing Postal 2 actually fosters sanguinolency?”

7. Jollux

Noun - Slang phrase used in the late 18th century to describe a “fat person” – Although I’m not sure whether this word was used crudely or in more of a lighthearted manner, to me it sounds like a nicer way to refer to someone who is overweight. “Fat” has such a negative connotation in English, but if you say “He’s a bit of a jollux” it doesn’t sound so bad!

8. Malagrugrous

Adj. – “Dismal” – This adjective is from Scots and may be derived from an old Irish word that refers to the wrinkling of one’s brow. An 1826 example of its use is “He looketh malagrugorous and world-wearied.” I’m tempted to also make the word into a noun: “Stop being such a malagrug!”

9. Brabble

Verb – “To quarrel about trifles; esp. to quarrel noisily, brawl, squabble” – Brabble basically means to argue loudly about something that doesn’t really matter, as in “Why are we still brabbling about who left the dirty spoon on the kitchen table?” You can also use it as a noun: “Stop that ridiculous brabble and do something useful!”

10. Freck

Verb intr. – “To move swiftly or nimbly” – I can think of a lot of ways to use this one, like “I hate it when I’m frecking through the airport and other people are going so slow.”

For 10 more interesting obsolete words, go to the next page.

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Language Learning

 

About The Author

Heather Carreiro

Heather is a secondary English teacher, travel writer and editor who has lived in Morocco and Pakistan. She enjoys jamming on the bass, haggling over saris in dusty markets and cross-country jumping on horseback. Currently she's a grad student attempting to wrap her tongue around Middle English, analyze South Asian literature and eat enough to make her Portuguese mother-in-law happy. Learn more on her blog at ExpatHeather.com.

  • Paul Sullivan

    Nice work Heather. I’m an ardent sesquipidalian, but there are lots here I’ve a) never heard of and b) adore. Malagrugrous!

  • Kathy

    “Brabble” and “freck” definitely have my vote :-)

  • http://www.meghanmhicks.com Meghan

    Love, love, love this post! Wordsmithing odd, unexpected words into one’s work is a pleasing endeavor. Another fun hobby is co-opting words for new purposes. Awesome article, thanks!

  • http://kristin5683.wordpress.com Kristin

    I like freck – nice one. Kench is good too, and I definitely just kenched (is that a correct use of the word and that sounds strange…) in the middle of my class – and I’m the teacher!

    • Heather Carreiro

      When the teacher kenches it can be embarrassing for everyone! : )

  • http://marykittneel.com Mary Kitt-Neel

    I like my afternoon soy shake quagswagged, not stirred.

  • http://www.cuadernoinedito.wordpress.com Julie

    Oh Lord, all of these are just fabulous! I’m totally incorporating some of them into my speech.

  • http://www.hopeandjosh.com HKNunzio

    Cool article! Perissology… the science of being too wordy.

  • http://twitter.com/aapremlall Anandi Premlall

    Don’t get all jargogled when I deliciate or kench with words corraded from old times. Besides, I’m not thrilled to be ludibrious and if you think so, we might brabble and you’d be subject to my sanguinolency. So when I looketh malagrugorous upon you, better get your freck on jollux.

    • Heather Carreiro

      Love “Get your freck on jollux!” – could be useful for coaches and weight loss trainers. : )

  • http://www.sophiesworld.net Sophie

    Such great words. I also like sisyphean, which isn’t obsolete I suppose, but not that frequently used (I think). Very good word to have for describing (and express frustration over) all the endlessly repetitive activities we do every day :)

  • Benjamin T.

    I think that many people could have some issues with using a word like twitter-light, since for many these days the root word twitter is merely something you do on the internet and not much else.

  • http://whatmygrandparentstaughtme.wordpress.com PatF

    Speaking of words. What about the everyday words we are losing? Since the explosion of cell phones and texting you, has become “u”, are has become “r”, be has become “b:” It won’t be long before this generation accepts texting shorthand as the official language of the Country.

    • Heather Carreiro

      Oh Pat – I hope that doesn’t happen! Sadly though I got an email earlier this week from a former student (one hoping to pursue a graduate degree in teaching English) that include “u” and “ur.”

    • http://@McKaylaBug K.Michelle

      As an English major, I worry about that as well. I have to say, though, lately I’ve seen more and more people stop using “text-language,” and go back to more proper terms. I think it was exciting at first to develop a new way to communicate, but I think now more and more people (even those in my 18-25 age group) are becoming annoyed with abbreviated words when texting. I’ll admit, there is *one* word I abbreviate when texting. “Tomorrow” becomes “tmw.” I’m ashamed, but sometimes, when you only have 140 characters, you need those other five!

      Nice article!

  • http://matadortravel.com/travel-community/nickrowlands Nick Rowlands

    “Do you fancy a brannigan tonight, or shall we invite a few people over and just deliciate?”
    “I vote for some chilled deliciation. You know your bibesy rears its head when you drink too much, and you act like a proper hoddypeak.”
    “I know, but she’s just so illecebrous – she has me all of a widdendream.”
    “I swear, one of these days I’m gonna quagswagg some sense into you if it kills me!”

    Fantastic article, Heather!

    • Heather Carreiro

      Nick, it sounds like you’ve already been using these words! The second example caused me to kench.

  • http://kaveyeats.com kavey

    Fabulous collection of words, must try and work those into my vocabulary!

  • Gail Davis

    Loved your article!!!!! I thought you may kench to learn my word pronunciation software has less than one third of your wonderful words, and my word speller insists my spelling is flawed! I apologize for the excessive use of exclamation marks , but felt they were warranted in this situation.

    • Heather Carreiro

      Yes, I had all sorts of red underlining in the word processor when I was working on this article!

  • Jeff

    Sometimes you can just tell from the way a person writes that they’ve never had a real job. These words are interesting, but most of them are merely synonyms for existing words and don’t add any nuances of meaning.

    French author Gustave Flaubert believed that in every situation there exists “le mot juste” – only one word that perfectly describes the meaning to be conveyed. In today’s world, too may people use vocabulary to make themselves appear witty or interesting rather than to communicate clearly and effectively.

    • Deborah

      but Jeff, Flaubert was a Frenchman, and, like many of his fellow citizens, a prescriptive purist about language.

      If there is one right word for every situation, doesn’t that mean that we should learn more words, so that we have a better chance of finding the truly perfect one in each instance?

      Especially anyone who has English as her or his native tongue; we can deliciate in the vast range of subtly different words that make up the wonderful hybrid hodgepodge of Brythonic, Germanic, Scandinavian and Romance influences that is the English language.

      Language can be beautiful as well as functional – can even be both simultaneously. A limited vocabulary doesn’t necessarily promote clarity, and an extensive one needn’t hinder it.

  • Me
  • http://audaciousfreedom.com Kerry-ann

    I just loved this article – not an English language fanatic because it often jargogles my brain. And next time my husband irritates me by frecking through the shops when I want to stop and look I am going to give him a malagrugrous look!

    • Heather Carreiro

      For my husband and I it’s the opposite: I try to freck it through the grocery store while he likes to look in every aisle and read all the labels…

      • Abby

        for my husband and me! (an idea for your next article)

        thank you for this article, my brain has stretched

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  • http://matadortravel.com/traveler/evasandoval EvaSandoval

    I enjoyed this article a lot; in my Sophomore year of High school, a big unit in my World History class was Middle English words. Fascinating! I’m forever besotted by “adam’s ale” (beer), “earth apple” (potato), and “dunderpate” (idiot). Words, words, words – I deliciate in words!

    • Heather Carreiro

      Yay for Middle English! I took an entire semester of Chaucer last spring and LOVED it.

    • http://yurase_ima_wo.livejournal.com Charlotte

      if you like “earth apple” (potato), you might like the Dutch word for potato, I suppose. We still use exactly that, earth apple. Except, of course, in Dutch (aardappel).

      Middle English sounds very interesting, but unfortunately, as a non-native English speaker, I have difficulties with vocabulary (and everything else that comes with learning new languages) enough as it is.

    • Larry Day

      The Dutch word for potato is aardappel (earth apple). It has occurred to me that it would be easier to read Middle English if one were bi-lingual in English and Dutch.

  • http://www.speaknowpeaceworks.wordpress.com Cheryl

    I deliciated in reading this blog post. It also prompted me to kench several times. I’d love to use lots of these words in my everyday speech, but I’m sure I’d make myself ludibrious by jargogling them all.

  • scrochet

    Well said, more words for my palate to drive my family crazy.

  • joan

    Looks like a few of us are into scriptitation! We should avoid perissology or the editors will see the $$ signs in our eyes and refuse to read any other syllable we ever submit to them. -J

    • Heather Carreiro

      Per-word payment encourages perissology for writers and discourages it for editors!

  • http://aclairedawn.blogspot.com Claire Dawn

    In Barbados, we call people who like rum a little too much “bibbers.” Wonder if it came from “bibesy.”

    • Heather Carreiro

      Wow that’s so interesting! I wonder how you could find out the etymology – seems like there’s a good chance that the two words are related due to the similar meaning.

      • Angie

        Can’t help but wonder if bibesy is derived from “imbibe”. As soon as I saw the word and definition imbibe came to mind. :)

        • Maggie

          It’ll probably have come from “Bibet,” the Latin root of Imbibe, which means “to drink” anything (rather than just alcohol).

  • jizzo

    Bask in my illecebrous glow, as I roam freck, like a ninja in the twitter-light. In this widdendream after a good brannigan, I have been searching for that yemeles hoddypeak George Bush, whilst I might give him a quagswagging. With the weap…ons I’ve been able to corrade, I kench and deliciate with thoughts of revenge. The fate of that ludibrious jollux who perpetuates sanguinolency is malagrugrous. Do not be jargogled, I brabble not. Let this scriptatation be the record. I do apologize if this has become a perissology…now, for some bibesy.

    • Heather Carreiro

      This made me laugh out loud (well okay the part about the “yemeles hoddypeak” was what got me). That’s talent to be able to use all these words in a single paragraph and make it sound poetic. Surely you deliciate in words. : )

  • http://www.travelmedianinja.com joshywashington

    I have already used the word Jargogle 3 times since I read this post…and the funny thing is the almighty spellcheck doesn’t recognize jargogle so it must be dead!!

    I think freck sounds like an expletive…”this frecking internet connection is frecking weak!”

    • Heather Carreiro

      Jargogle is one of my favorites too! I’ve been using it all week.

  • Jonscott

    I deliciated in these words even as I fought to overcome the tendency of my brain to jargogle as I read them. … some even led me to kench. I must admit; at first glance the list does seem like a corraded gathering of nonsense sounds. And one would have to suppress a fear of becoming the ludibrious focus of some uninformed dimwit were these words to be used in certain environs.

    Still, if the insult were directed at the right sanguinolent individual (particularly someone recently returned frm a brannigan) the outcome, for the unfortunate source of such a jibe, might well be rather malagrugrous. Of course, not being one personally to brabble, my tendency, were I to be in that situation, would be to freck to place of safety rather than remain quagswagging in fear of fisticuffs. Any hoddypeak would know better than to remain!

    Of course, the circumstance could lead to one experiencing a widdendream resulting in bibesy and, should one over indulge, amoment of yemles – possibly finding some gentleman’s lady illecebrous to the point of behaving inappropriately.

    Alas this scriptitation, and the fact that it is way beyond twitter-light, appears to have led to a bout of perissology, for which I beg your indulgence.

  • Indy

    Chosing Malagrugrous as in the Seattle weather’s malagrugrous today.

  • http://rryalsrussell.com Rebecca Ryals Russell

    What’s so great about these words is people will think you made them up but you know they’re for real. Can’t wait to use them in conversation.

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  • Mary Kay Bearden

    I loved this article! Like “me” above, I use the word absquatulate often. (as in, my best friend’s husband absquatulated while she was on vacation.) and that’s no bushwa.
    Another wonderful source for unusual words is Mrs. Byrne’s Dictionary of Unusual and Preposterous words.

    • Heather Carreiro

      Ooh thanks – hadn’t heard of that book yet. : )

  • Caspar

    Yeah. Fun! I’m in.

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  • http://MonkeyBrewster.com Cornelius Aesop

    Wow I love this list I want to use almost every word right away.

    • Heather Carreiro

      Do it! One reader already challenged another to use all 20 in a poem, and it was done successfully – I was quite impressed.

      • SD Dalton

        Thank you. Alas, I was not able to get it into one paragraph as your other reader did! ;-)

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  • http://budgettravelerssandbox.com Nancie

    There are so many great words here. I have to go with “deliciate”

    They often deliciate with a good bottle of wine at their favorite sidewalk cafe.

    • Heather Carreiro

      Mmmm. I can’t wait to deliciate in the spiced apple bread I’ve got baking in the oven. : )

  • http://mentalcrud.wordpress.com mentalcrud

    I’m gonna start using all of these all the time.

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  • http://writelife.net/ Bill Wren

    Corrade sounds like a variation of corral. Or corral is a variation of corrade. Either way, verb-wise they seem to mean the same thing. Just sayin’ … :)

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  • http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/ Mary Mark Ockerbloom

    “Sanguinolent” seems like the perfect descriptor for the current over-population of vampire fiction spinoffs in both the young-adult and adult sections of bookstores…

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  • http://www.4qlearning.com Katya

    Find my example with the word _Delicate_ at http://twitter.com/4qlearning :)

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  • http://ariehzimmerman.livejournal.com Arieh Zimmerman

    May I please add ‘aposiopesis, (sp?).
    The act of going into another room and upon reaching it, forgetting why you came for.

    • Heather Carreiro

      Ooh I like that one. I’ve been doing that a lot recently…

  • http://storycomments.blogspot.com Jen Bee

    I just kenched while reading this; I often inadvertently laugh out loud while reading books and always thoroughly embarrass myself. Thankfully there was no one around this time. Jargoggle has to be my favourite though I will be using them all, and definitely squeezing some into my creative dissertation.

  • http://2blog2share2learn.edublogs.org/ VRBurton

    Thanks for the mental workout.

    To deliciate in the commotion caused by jargogling my students by using new words in a corraded sentence leads me to kench.

  • marian king

    I hate to brabble, but I had to kench when I read this article. It seems that Heather’s brain may be a bit jargogled: Her malagrugrous use of the English language has led me to the conclusion that, instead of deliciating in antiquated words, Heather would do well to spend her time less yemelesly by brushing up on her present-day language, specifically grammar and spelling. She claims to be a teacher; one would hope she is not a teacher of ENGLISH!!

    • Heather Carreiro

      I’ve decided to take this comment as a compliment. : ) Current slang does jargogle me – living abroad can do that!

  • Longbowman

    The vire, maaaan, the vire. Totally slayed my job, dude. Totally slayed the longbow.

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  • Sarah

    Very few, if any, of these words are in the dictionary. They aren’t words.

    • Heather Carreiro

      Hey Sarah,

      You won’t find these words in a contemporary dictionary because they are obsolete, meaning they’ve gone out of use. You can find them in the Oxford English Dictionary, an amazing resource that also includes words from Early and Middle English. Generally you need to subscribe or have access to a library in order to access the OED. If you read anything in Middle English or even some Early Modern English, you’ll find these words in use.

  • EGB

    A wonderful piece! However, I am fine when words based on bigoted ethnic stereotypes are reduced to historical curiosities. (Looking at you, “brannigan.”)

    • Heather Carreiro

      Hi EGB,

      Thanks for your comment, and I apologize if the choice of the word “brannigan” comes across as offensive. Based on the historical examples of its usage and the etymological details listed in the OED, I didn’t interpret the word as based on ethnic stereotypes, but I admit I’m not an expert on late 19th century and early 20th century North American slang. My intent was not to be reductive, and if you would like to add details here in the comments about why that word is offensive/should NOT be put back into use, please feel free to add them. The conversation is always open and critical feedback welcome!

      Heather

  • Andrew

    A few years ago, I heard of a word meaning “to look at someone who has just produced some food in the hopes that you will be offered some.” I have completely forgotten what the word is, but find it applicable several times a day! Anyone know what it is?

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  • http://ChristaWrites.com Christa Fletcher

    This is such a great article. I thoroughly enjoyed reading each of these definitions. My friends and I circulated your article and created many sentences by playing with the words over IM. I thought I’d share my most recent creation for fun: “Teens love to post about ‘Twilight’ on Twitter during twitter-light.”

    Thanks for your hard work and wordsmithery!

    • Heather Carreiro

      Thanks Christa! So glad you enjoyed it. There are many more fun words in those two books by Erin McKeen – the majority listed aren’t obsolete, but they’re all rarely used.

      I think you’ve created a new tongue twister with that ‘twitter-light’ sentence!

  • TJ

    Absolutely enjoyed this! I’ve studied English officially for ten years now (I’m 20), but I’ve always thought of it as my second native. I just love how, well, corraded and flexible it is! Jargogling, even ;)
    Thanks for the great post!

  • whomichael

    While I deliciate in corrading odd words , I fear they will jargogle people’s brains. I also fear attaining a ludibrious quality in which even dear friends (but especially hoodypeaks) would kench at my speech, or brabble with me about the l…egitimacy of my vocabulary. This could, in turn, move my personality to a malagrugrous state, and possibly cause a sanguinolency to develop within myself. Or I may depress myself into a bibesy state, chasing brannigan after brannigan, transmorphing myself into a jollux. My mind may then unravel into a widdendream, and I could spend my days frecking around and quagswagging about my house. Although I find old words illecebrous, I swear to never become yemeles in creating perissologous scriptitations to avoid these cruel fates in the twitter-light of my life.

  • Old Man Sedgwick

    … If we want to reactivate ‘obsolete English words’, I hereby nominate ‘please’ and ‘thank you’.

    Either those, or ‘tri-dapt spraggleflorm’. (The tri-dapt spraggleflorm was basically a brog danker with flumper runks, except that in the tri-dapt spraggleflorm, the hornswoggles were directly connected to the flubs.)

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  • Crowbar

    To c-c-c-combo break the pseudo-eloquent posts here that exist solely for the application of the above-mentioned terms in an otherwise superfluous and meaningless text, it is funny to point out that for instance “brabble” is used as a colloquial term with the exact meaning in German to this day, albeit in the Germanisation “brabbeln”.

  • Slugkid

    Actually, the world sanguinolent is mildly used in spanish, still. I can tell since I’m argentinian. Sanguinary is a nicer word, and it’s pretty much the same.

  • endblink

    I’m a huge fan of the word “philocalist.”

    http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?s=philocalist&gwp=13

  • http://gilmoure.tumblr.com Gilmoure

    Don’ jargogle me bro.

    • Lisa

      please- easy on the ludibrious sanguinolency- it’s scares me.

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  • Colin Nicol

    As a keen Scrabbler I checked to see which of these words were still allowable. No 3. CORRADE, 4. KENCH, 6. SANGUINOLENCY, 9. BRABBLE, 11. BRANNIGAN, 12. PERISSOLOGY and obviously both parts of No. 19. TWITTER & LIGHT, but no hyphens, so not the whole thing are all valid plays in today’s game.

  • http://febrilemuse-infectious-disease.blogspot.com CM Doran

    What fun! Bring them back….I’m going to use one…..the next post will be on La Boheme….which one to chose. Thanks for writing a great piece.

  • peter

    my dad calls me jollux but im not fat

  • William Wilgus

    I imagine they became obsolete because they’re awkward. For example, ‘verbose’ or ‘verbosity’ is much less awkward than ‘perissology’.

    • Alice

      My thoughts exactly.

  • http://yellowfat.wordpress.com Dixon

    Dear Heather,
    Wonderful article (which I deliciated in, fully), and a bass player to boot!
    (Us’ns gotta stick together, if for nothing else but to keep the guitards at bay!)
    You’ve shown an eleemosynary streak a mile wide by bringing these agèd orphans back into literary light and life…thank you, and good on ya!

    • Heather Carreiro

      Thanks Dixon! What kind of bass do you play?

  • Max Entropy

    James Taranto was on a campaign to bring back “Kerfuffle”.
    If you can slip it into a sentence, it brings out a round of “what was that?”

    • Heather Carreiro

      What does kerfuffle mean? It has a great sound to it.

    • http://storycomments.blogspot.com Jen Bee

      Bring back kerfuffle? I didn’t think it had left. I’ve always used it…

      “A disorderly outburst or tumult”

  • mk bearden

    I remember I first heard the word “kerfuffle” a few years ago – then it seemed I heard it many times over the next few months. Haven’t heard it lately, but someone “trying to bring it back” sounds like a true story to me!

  • Casey

    Anatiferous – adj.- producing ducks.

    Fromt he 17th century dictionary at St. Johns College, Oxford, England

  • http://thetriondexperiment.blogspot.com The Triond Experiment

    My math teacher in highschool call the dumbest of the class hoddypeak. I was one of them. I wonder what happened to Mr. Tillman?

  • Pat

    Fascinating. I’m wondering if “jollux” is the real reason that we say that fat men are “jolly”?

  • Luc

    I enjoyed the list, and in regards to #15 Bibesy’s origin, I definitely noticed a connection between it and the Latin “bibere,” which means “to drink.”

    • Paul

      Many of these have a Latin Origin, in fact. Bibesy (bibere = to drink), scriptitation (scriptitare = to write constantly), illecebrous (illeceber = alluring).

  • http://www.santafetravelers.com santafetraveler

    Love the obsolete English- sounds a little bit like it escaped from the pages of Lewis Carroll. Twas brillig!

  • http://www.goseewrite.com/ Michael Hodson

    I have rarely enough a post this much lately. :)

  • Andrea

    I choose “deliciate”. It will be my New year’s resolution….More opportunities to deliciates, please!

    • Brian McCann

      I’m thinking that “deliciate” would be something Sarah Palin would say in a hot tub with champagne and chocolate…

      • Heather Carreiro

        Oh Brian, you just ruined this word for me now that I pictured her saying it in my head.

      • http://www.google.com/ Jera

        Dz2uBh Very true! Makes a change to see someone spell it out like that. :)

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  • Debaloo

    I agree with your assessment of “jollux.” I liken it to the fun modern word “chillax.” Hmmm. Maybe adding an “x” just makes works more fun.

  • serenity

    Thank you! Brought up a few smiles of delight….love any word i dont hear overused!!

  • http://douglassigler.com Doug Sigler

    Heather,

    One of my favorite words that is little used in the US language is Haver:

    Verb to haver (third-person singular simple present havers, present participle havering, simple past and past participle havered)

    1.(UK) To hem and haw
    2.(Scottish) To maunder; to talk foolishly; to chatter; talking nonsense; to babble  

  • http://www.samehands.blogspot.com Alex

    Symphysy is a good one also

  • Pingback: obsolete words that should make a comeback « Thing of the Day

  • Althea Estey

    I’m a little jargogled by all the ludibrious brabbling in congress. I wish those hoddypeaks would freck a little, corrade a lot, and stop quagswagging the American people. All the yemeles perrisology in the world is not going to change the fact that it is their job to turn in a budget. Congress seems to be stuck in a widdendream. They should have had this done long before twitter-light Friday. I am sadly pushed into bibesy over it all and find that a brannigan is becoming more and more illecebrous! A little kenching and deliciating sounds like fun. If this isn’t resolved soon, the American people are going to be overcome with sanguinolency and head for DC to take the malagrugorous jolluxes to task.
    2 seconds ago · Like

    • Heather Carreiro

      Love it! You should send this statement to your senator.

    • Rahul Maurya

      What a beautiful &meaningfull use of all these forgotten words you have managed to carve out of your brain. Really nice.

    • Sherby

      You make it seem like that all just came tumbling out of your head on the spur of the moment.

    • Jules9599

      You are amazing!

    • Ron Serina

      A timely and artful display of verbal gymnastics …well done  

    • James H

      Genius!

    • Sstyle77

       This statement makes me kench.

  • Kaitlyn

    Hey linguistics major, the last word should be slowly. Otherwise I enjoyed this post :)

    • Heather Carreiro

      LOL – totally didn’t notice that. I just wrote it how I would actually say it!

  • Es

    to brabble is used widely in Holland. We call it ” brabbellen”
    Ik brabbel – I brabble

    • Mushion

       It’s not used in the same context though. Brabble here means squabbling. Brabbelen in Dutch is the same as babbling :P

  • Cody Barrus

    My favorite was ‘brannigan’, I will be sure to use that word soon, particularly in the midst of a brannigan for optimum effect

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_HALGYCUPTCCR5KOEW3VX5Z7M5I Susan K

     These words are all so useful. I love the sounds and meanings and am working on incorporating them into my speech.

  • Thekings_za

    Excellent work, can we consider
     maffick [ˈmæfɪk]vb (intr) Brit archaic to celebrate extravagantly and publicly[back formation from Mafeking (now Mafikeng), from the rejoicings at the relief of the siege there in 1900]mafficker  n

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Z6742IA2SESDM2ULT3Y6MIAHHU Random Luser

    This is just copypasta

  • Andrew

    What about ‘fribble’ – one who busies himself to no purpose? And its even more wonderful derivatives, fribblish and fribbledom.  

    • mond5004

      Old people would still say fribble-frabble when talking about useless activities or things when I was a kid.

      It has now made it’s way into the Urban Dictionary and taken on the meaning of “jibberish”

  • Jasper

    “Twitter-light” sounds more like a Twitter application of some sort. :P

    • Jwideman62

      Next thing on the App market “TwitterLite” That way you don’t have to see all the ppl who update twitter while on the John.

  • guest

    Zach Brannigan’s name from Futurama fits him perfectly, I didn’t know that.

  • john

    pointless article, language evolves and devolves organically, resurrecting words for their own sake serves no purpose

    • Rafiqkathwari

      “…you are being yemeles…”

  • Linnea

    I’m a word nerd too, and I loved reading this. Will definitely be using “hoddypeak” and “deliciate” as well as  some of the others as the occasion arises. 

  • Kathryn

    I love words.

  • http://thetentacledpentacle.com VonMalcolm

    Did Jar Jar Binks jargogle  The Phantom Menace?  New word:  JarJargogle: to jumble something up in a silly, childlike manner.

  • Vandren

    I actually use “freck” in some of my fiction, as a curse – a combination of frell (Farscape) and frak (BSG).

  • Judoqueen2016

    Instead of using lol, I’ll just say ‘kench’!
    Kench.

  • Rhainebow

    you actually used the non-word “alright”??? shameful. it’s “all right”.

  • Ming the Merciless

    Sanguinolent is not an English word but french for “bloody”…modern spelling: “sanglant”,
    although both have a slightly different meaning.

     But “old English” evolved from german dialect to French creole anyway.

    It  came from Saxon servants imitating their Norman masters…who where treating them dreadfully.

    But not worse than the Anglo-Saxons treated the Celtic population they invaded from Germany.

    But Celts themselves invaded from southern Russia…God know what population they invaded and slaughtered in England!

  • Irish Cailin

    Didn’t Laura “Brannigan” sing that song “Gloria” back in the late 70s – early 80s? hahaha

  • http://prussan.soup.io Prussan

    What about Zemblanity?  It’s the opposite of serendipity and hence means to, unsurprisingly, discover an unhappyness.

    “Oh, the zemblanity of it all!”

  • Stephanie3235

    I love this! But it would be quite helpful if you put the pronuciations in here because I dont want to use to wrd and prononce it wrong.

  • savethewords

     Other wonderful obselete words:
    Apanthropanization — withdrawal from the social world
    Dodrantal — nine inches in length
    Squiriferous — gentlemanly

  • Gargamont

    My mood turns malagrugrous now that we will be unable to freck to your illecebrous corrade. How I long to deliciate and kench while endulging my sanguinolency unto the scant twitter-light! My bibesy compels me to jargogle myself with a ludibrious brannagan, exhibiting renowned yemeles, until I’m found brabbling and quagswagging like a hoddypeak! Please pardon this perissology of a scriptitation. I am after all a jollux in a widdendream.

  • fdvce

    you forgot Flibbertigibbet

  • http://lisahendrix.com Lisa Hendrix

    I believe yemeless still is in use. We just spell & pronounce it as aimless.

  • http://www.authorjulieglover.blogspot.com Julie Glover

    How can one not wish to bring back jargogle, brabble, and quagswagging? They roll off the tongue like teasers, and I deliciate each of them. Thanks for these words with meanings that are not the least bit obsolete. Too bad no one else will know what I’m talking about when I use them!

  • Scott

    What Fun!  Thank you for putting this up.

  • http://www.myducttapelife.com Michael Walden

    I love the looks you get from people when you use words such as these in a conversation!

  • Graham L

    This is somebody who loves English, is it!  ”I hate it when I’m frecking through the airport and other people are going so slow.”  You mean slowly, not slow.  Slow is an adjective, not an adverb.

    • VonMalcolm

      Slow can be used as an adverb informally.

  • Followingsunshine

    I don’t know if I can pronounce them, but I do know we need to upscale the language.

  • Taimunozhan

    Ereyesterday and overmorrow FTW! :)

  • http://keycaptchaured.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit-comments.php?comment_status=spam&paged=07 Conspywrightor

    Deliciating my widdendream from scriptitating perissology about illecebrous hoddypeaks in twitter-light

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=703601305 Laney Stevens Nielsen

    one thru four
    love ya for them
    thanks

  • Dillo

    Jaysus, Mary, and Joseph, doesn’t Irish English count?

  • Rferrara67

    great stuff (and i use ‘stuff’ as a major compliment).
    i’ve been told there is a site by linguists that predicts words used today that will become obsolete in the next 20, 50, 100 years. if you know where i can find this please let me know.
    rferrara67@yahoo.com
    am aware languages tend to keep numbers, body parts and pronouns but others fade away.
    many believe, with good reason i think, that our DO verb will be lost ( non-native english speakers would love this to happen today!) and a word such as ‘any’ could also die out.
    a sentence like “do you have any money?” can easily be understood thru inflection using just “you have money?”
    appreciate your site and any help you can provide with the site i’d love to visit.
    thank you.

  • Rferrara67

     
     
    i verified my email but then noticing you have fees for the service i have decided NOT to subscribe
    please therefore remove me from your list of subscribes immediately as i am not in any financial position these days to spend money i do not have.
    it was disappointing to find that trying to email you from the email address you contacted  me by as well as the email shown for contacting you both failed – for this reason i am sending this email to you and saving a copy for my files.

    please confirm by return email this has been done and thank you for your understanding.
    rferrara

  • http://www.tiecoon.com/neckties/tiecolor.html Tie Color

    Cravate Motif.  Bring it back.

  • http://milano.bbakeca.com/ Bakeca Milano

    Very interesting article…thanks for sharing!

  • Rick

    Great stuff…..I find that brabble might be one of the most useful on the list….I find that I brabble on the most insignificant, trivial stuff. But that is sometimes such a simple thing to deliciate in.

  • http://twitter.com/crispsearingice da-ba-loo

    I love how you breathed life into these dormant joys!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Angel-Firestone/1410862224 Angel Firestone

    Makes me sad that such words are not being used.  Probably because they’re being replaced with words like “mankini,” “jeggings,” and “OMG.”

  • http://www.facebook.com/mark.s.hankins Mark S. Hankins

    I’m in favor of “codswallop” and I use some word that are almost obsolete like “feckless” fairly often.

  • https://twitter.com/#!/MikeSlickster Mike Slickster

    My ex-wife was the queen of brabble :)~

  • Guest

    I wonder if Heather was not engaging in perissology herself, given her redundant example.

  • Foster

    Congrats, Heather! This article was on AOL’s newsfeed today. You’re moving up in the world! :)

  • http://twitter.com/ColleenWelsch Colleen Welsch

    Bibesy – are you sure it doesn’t mean when you have a desire that is too earnest AFTER you drink? i.e. sex, taco bell, etc.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Leonardo-Almeida/100000203599332 Leonardo Almeida

    Interesting…That’s for you Steve Burnett, from Chicago, IL, who is now in Toronto, Canada, but wanted to be in Los Angeles, CA writing pseudo-intellectual books.

  • Tarun Sharma130

    A good one–of corrading such illecebrous words that can potentially put the user in widdendream, jargogle their brains, get them termed ludibrious, deliciate and kench the reader and at the end of it might be classified as perissology. :)..Tarun

  • Dmajor

    I’m surprised that JK Rowling never used Malagrugrous as the name of a character.  Also, “twitter-light” isn’t bad, but why use it when “crepuscule” is available?

  • http://coolmainpress.com/ajwriting/ Andre Jute

    Deliciating in the power of words, quagswagging the prissy oneshttp://coolmainpress.com/ajwriting/archives/2441

  • http://lupussolusluna.blogspot.com/ LoboSolo

    Actually, I find most of these boring … which is likely why they fell out of the tung. If you’re trying to wrap your tung around Middle English then you likely know that widdendream itself is a corruption of wodendream. There you can also see the true root which is also the root of the word wode (madness, insanity) which can sometimes be found in the phrase “to wax wode” (to grow angry).

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Matt-Cola/734345460 Matt Cola

    I’m just mildly disappointed that the word fisticuffs didn’t make it in here.

  • Guest

    Must use some of these words, and SOON!!!

  • http://twitter.com/ewillse ewillse

    I might have mis-parsed “bibesy,” from its definition, a too-earnest desire after drink. I thought it meant… handsy after having a few. 

  • Dee

    i would like to add the word “smote.”  not enough smoting in this day and age.

  • Daniel Dowd

    I LOVE this list and absolutely agree that malagrug should be a noun. I know a few malagrugs – bunch of Puddleglums, they are. If the word does not find its way into the language naturally, those of a mind to generate literature could always make a fictitious race called the Malagrugs who are interminably morose.

  • Tiggypop

    Please! People can hardly spell the words we’re throwing around now! LOL

  • http://viruscaptive.com/ free download

    Great post! I am aware of. From my experience I would say that I can learn many things from many, some unknown. I am not aware of anything around your site. I have bookmark your site. We hope to get better in the future. The eye – thanks!

  • KayelleAllen

    That was fun! I’m frecking grabbing one of these right now. ;)

  • Phadenot

    I think you should think about this amazing word:  Skinflint: a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spend

  • Jenny Panchal

    This stage of my PhD requires scriptitation. There are times when I find my writing full of perissology, which leads me to widdendream! So who can blame me for brabbling on a late Friday afternoon? Oh well, speaking of Friday, don’t you think we should go for a brannigan, Dharmesh and Shashankraj? ;-)
    Now, this post may make me seem ludibrious, but please admit it… you find me illecebrous instead, don’t you?
    #confidence2dhighestlevel
    “Virgilio and Cheryl, hirit na! ;-P”

  • Nikhil Kashyap

    nice tips!

  • Catherine Holliss

    This one is a share for Fred Holliss, who loves words as much as I do…

  • Peter Smith

    No.1 could be updated to Jargoogle.

  • Peter Smith

    and for Quakers quagswags are what SQIFs have.

  • Khadija Grace Cruzata Garcia

    very nice…

    • Mika Barrios

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    • Khadija Grace Cruzata Garcia

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  • Si Baker-Goodwin

    In my kenching at your post, I inadvertently woke my roommate who is now frecking toward me (ow!) to brabble (double ow!) about that kenching! (muted sounds of…

    • Anngail Levick Smith

      no good word there for totally totally excellent!

    • Si Baker-Goodwin

      kenching…

  • Brooke Renee Reeves

    I am always in a state of scriptitation…but I’ve yet to finish a story.

  • Sidney Huster

    hello every one I have just met with this prophetharry@ymail. com and I finally find out that he is really a truthful spell caster and so powerful and he is the most powerful spell caster that I have ever met. I wish I have met him on time. my husband have just come back to me and every thing happened just the way prophet harry had said it, I am so happy that I have met with prophet harry and now I have my husband back to my self. if you all that are here have not tried prophet harry just have to do so and get your heart desires fulfilled. stop been doubting I have tested him and I am now a fulfilled woman.

  • Mathew Freeman

    I enjoyed this, and am wondering which words I might start to use–but “alright” is not correct usage.

    • Ali Starr

      Hahaha you corrected like a hundred “alright”s for me! Sometimes it takes me a while to catch on :)

    • Jake Serafin

      Your usage of the comma is not necessary either….

  • Vasudha Srinivasan

    I can’t believe how everyword could describe my friendship with my closest friends. Here’s to you heather!

    “My friends deliciate in the fact that sometimes I tend to jargogle the pronunciation of words.

    They love corrading stories about me and laugh, no kench, about it relentlessly. And the stories are corraded so freckly! They make me feel so ludibrious that sometimes I feel like could almost be sanguinolent.

    But of course, it doesn’t help that I always brabble until I am malagrugous. so that just allows them to poke fun at me more. Weirdly, I am very articulate after a brannigan though I may tend towards slight perissology. But atleast I’m not a hoddypeak or a quagswagger after a brannigan! This phenomen should make me bibesy but strangely it has not.

    My tendency to jargogle also plagues my scriptitation. I am often questioned by my friendless haplessly as to whether I am in a widdendream when in reality, I’m just being yemeles in the way I express myself.

    But I really know my friends love me and think that this really makes me illecebrous. I mean, these are the same bunch of friends who use “jollux” as a term of endearment.

  • Conor Fennell

    Well done, Heather.
    Brannigan would be my favourite. It has a nice Irish ring to it and I will be going on one next Tuesday.
    About Perissology: would I be pedantic if I suggested your example is tautologous? If it means “more words than necessary” then you cannot say the writer has too much more words than necessary. Sorry!

  • Bonnie Wykoff

    I LOVED THIS! I am trying to work the words kench, brabble, deliciate, and freck into my everyday conversation! Quagswagging looks and sounds fun, but I don’t have much occasion to use it…

  • Bonnie Wykoff

    OOPs. And jargogle. LOVED that one!

  • Inessa Valueva

    Twitter-light sound like hours after the sun goes down spend on Twitter) like in: “It’s dark already and here comes my twitter-light.” lol.

  • Somewhere Or Bust

    Heading for an illecebrous brannigan with a few hoddypeaks, expect quagswagging and widdendreams from yemeles bibseys by the time it’s twitter-light. Apologies for the perissology and scriptation.

  • Ann Heath Stites

    Thank you Sallie for sharing.

  • Ann Heath Stites

    Thank you Sallie for sharing.

  • Josh Steed

    I think ‘Jargogle’ and ‘Kench’ would be excellent band-names.

    • Jazzman John Clarke

      We had some close friends who lived outside Birmingham & their surname was Kench -the old Dad was Walter(he had a nicotine-stained moustache) & his daughter’s were Marjorie & Hilda who were like ‘chalk & cheese’.Hilda was a rarity – she passed her Advanced Driving Test when few women actually drove in the UK – she went out with racing drivers once apparently!

    • Jazzman John Clarke

      We had some close friends who lived outside Birmingham & their surname was Kench -the old Dad was Walter(he had a nicotine-stained moustache) & his daughter’s were Marjorie & Hilda who were like ‘chalk & cheese’.Hilda was a rarity – she passed her Advanced Driving Test when few women actually drove in the UK – she went out with racing drivers once apparently!

  • Cynthia Harris

    This is wonderful! There are several words on this list that I can work into a project I am working on. Thanks so very much for sharing.

  • Cynthia Harris

    This is wonderful! There are several words on this list that I can work into a project I am working on. Thanks so very much for sharing.

    • Miriam Climenhaga

      No share button? That’s okay, I can do it the old fashioned obsolete way by copy and pasting. ;)

    • Anne Taylor

      Yes, me too. Thanks for a charming posting.

  • Gregory Wm. Gunn

    I have employed, and continue to employ some of these obsolete words, and peeps merely think such a lexicon is a Gregorian (Gunnian if you prefer) fabrication.

  • Gregory Wm. Gunn

    I have employed, and continue to employ some of these obsolete words, and peeps merely think such a lexicon is a Gregorian (Gunnian if you prefer) fabrication.

  • John Hilferty

    I like “spratling” for a kid.

    • Ellen O’Brien

      Thanks, John, this is great! Going to share…..

  • Paul Hunnemann

    I’d much rather use these words than ebonics any ol’day.

  • Matt Slater

    nah

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Brian Meeks

    It was nothing but a bit of scriptitation and had been going on since early the previous morning.

  • Mary O’Shaughnessy

    Methinks the feminine of “jollux” should be “jollice” and thus applicable to me.

    • Douglas Gershuny

      I will try to use at least 3 of these words in a brief I am writing.

    • Douglas Gershuny

      I will try to use at least 3 of these words in a brief I am writing.

    • Douglas Gershuny

      I will try to use at least 3 of these words in a brief I am writing.

    • Douglas Gershuny

      I will try to use at least 3 of these words in a brief I am writing.

  • Mary O’Shaughnessy

    Methinks the feminine of “jollux” should be “jollice” and thus applicable to me.

  • Mary O’Shaughnessy

    Methinks the feminine of “jollux” should be “jollice” and thus applicable to me.

  • Mary O’Shaughnessy

    Methinks the feminine of “jollux” should be “jollice” and thus applicable to me.

  • Mary O’Shaughnessy

    Methinks the feminine of “jollux” should be “jollice” and thus applicable to me.

  • Adrian Brend

    I’m not sure if this had been corraded and I hope it doesn’t jargogle you. I’m sure you will Deliciate and kentch, I hope you don’t find it too Malagrugrous and you won’t brabble about it creating widdendream and turning you to sanguinolency because your a hoddypeak.

  • Adrian Brend

    I’m not sure if this had been corraded and I hope it doesn’t jargogle you. I’m sure you will Deliciate and kentch, I hope you don’t find it too Malagrugrous and you won’t brabble about it creating widdendream and turning you to sanguinolency because your a hoddypeak.

  • Adrian Brend

    I’m not sure if this had been corraded and I hope it doesn’t jargogle you. I’m sure you will Deliciate and kentch, I hope you don’t find it too Malagrugrous and you won’t brabble about it creating widdendream and turning you to sanguinolency because your a hoddypeak.

  • Adrian Brend

    I’m not sure if this had been corraded and I hope it doesn’t jargogle you. I’m sure you will Deliciate and kentch, I hope you don’t find it too Malagrugrous and you won’t brabble about it creating widdendream and turning you to sanguinolency because your a hoddypeak.

  • Adrian Brend

    I’m not sure if this had been corraded and I hope it doesn’t jargogle you. I’m sure you will Deliciate and kentch, I hope you don’t find it too Malagrugrous and you won’t brabble about it creating widdendream and turning you to sanguinolency because your a hoddypeak.

  • Mike Cluff

    I am not only tempted to use it as noun, Ishall. Malagrug is now in my vocab.

  • Mike Cluff

    I am not only tempted to use it as noun, Ishall. Malagrug is now in my vocab.

  • Andrea Zuvich

    I like these so much, I’ve already used three in my newest book! Good stuff! Thanks for this!

  • Kim

    I would have thought that “Bibesy” is probably related to “imbibe” – a not so common English word, but not redundant yet :)

  • http://dbakeca.com Dbakeca Italia

    interesting topic

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