1. Alaska Sealife Center

Located in Seward, the Alaska Sealife Center is the only public aquarium and ocean wildlife rescue center in Alaska. Between exhibits, education, and rehabilitation, they are one of the only non-profit organizations in the world that has both a public aquarium and fully-supported research facility in the same building. With state-of-the-art laboratories, aquarium animals that participate in research, and extensive field work, the Alaska SeaLife Center has
quickly become the cold-water research facility in the United States.

2. Alaska Wildlife Alliance

The Alaska Wildlife Alliance (AWA) advocates for healthy ecoystems, wildlife, and habitat in Alaska. Working to reform wildlife public policy, they focus on predator control, hunting and trapping regulations, marine mammal issues, impacts of commercial use of wildlife, development impacts, public participation in wildlife policy, and public education regarding Alaskan wildlife.

3. Anchorage Audobon Society

The Anchorage Audubon Society chapter is a volunteer, non-profit organization that is dedicated to the conservation of Southcentral Alaska ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit and enjoyment of current and future generations. They provide field trips, natural history presentation, newsletters, a bird hotline, education programs for adults and children and support for conservation issues.

4. The Nature Conservancy — Alaska

Since 1988, The Nature Conservancy has used science to help safeguard Alaska’s lands and waters for nature and people. They protect and restore salmon habitat in Bristol Bay, Matanuska-Susitna Basin, and in the Tongass. The Conservancy has also helped to create the Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve, the Palmer Hay Flats State Game Refuge, and the Gustavus Forelands Preserve.

5. Alaska Wilderness League

The Alaska Wilderness League (AWL) is a nonprofit organization that works to protect Alaska’s most significant wild lands from oil and gas drilling and from other industrial threats. Starting in 2004, AWL expanded its work to include ecologically-significant areas of Alaska’s vast National Petroleum Reserve, the Tongass National Forest,
and the outer continental shelf areas of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. Through the protection of these wild lands, polar bears and beluga whales off the Arctic Coast, migrating Caribou herds and old-growth forests among salmon spawning streams have been spared. AWL’s work has had long-standing support from President Jimmy Carter, who remains the Honorary Chairman of the Board of Directors.

6. Kachemak Bay Conservation Society

Kachemak Bay Conservation Society is concerned with environmental protection of the Kachemak Bay and Kenai Peninsula region. The organization focuses on habitat and wildlife issues, wetlands protection, water quality, logging, oil and gas leases, energy conservation, sustainability issues, and land-use planning. The Society monitors environmental issues locally and statewide.

7. Lynn Canal Conservation, Inc.

Founded in 1971, LCC campaigned for the establishment of the 48,000 acre Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve and protection of the Haines State Forest. It is now working to ensure that these areas are managed to protect the habitat needed for healthy populations of eagles and other wildlife. LCC is currently focused on the Kensington mine, which threatens the waters of Lynn Canal with a toxic mixing zone.

8. Northern Alaska Environmental Center

NAEC has been working to protect some of the wildest country left in North America since 1971. The vast Interior and Arctic regions of Alaska includes 293,000 square miles of largely pristine wilderness, 3,200 miles of coastline, and incalculable miles of streams and rivers. It strives to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil drilling and advocates for wilderness protection of the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge. It also works to protect the 23.5 million acre National Petroleum Reserve (NPR-A) in the western Arctic.

9. The Southeast Alaska Conservation Council

SEACC is a coalition of 15 groups in Southeastern Alaska working to maintain the health of the Tongass National Forest — the largest remaining temperate rainforest on Earth. Their primary concerns are timber clearcutting, fish and wildlife habitation protection, sustainable multiple use of Tongass lands, road construction, mining, Forest Service Wilderness management, management of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, and the Haines State Forest. The Tongass National Forest is one of the last great salmon strongholds on our planet and SEACC works to protect the foundation of a $1 billion fishing industry that powers our local communities, and supplies salmon to the world.

10. Wildlife Federation of Alaska (now part of The National Wildlife Federation)

The Wildlife Federation of Alaska is dedicated to conserving Alaska’s fish, wildife, and habitat for the benefit of present and future generations. WFA involves and educates people in decisions affecting habitat conservation, and promotes the stewardship and enjoyment of Alaska’s fish and wildlife resources. Members are involved in habitat
conservation to ensure that future generations will be able to enjoy Alaska’s fish and wildlife.

11. Alaska Raptor Center

Une photo publiée par Jake S. (@itsjake) le

The Alaska Raptor Center is the only full-service avian hospital in the state of Alaska and one of four in the United States. Since 1980, they have provided medical treatment to injured birds, educational programs about Alaska’s birds and environmental conservation as well as conducted bald eagle research. They provide medical treatment to about 100-200 birds every year, one-third of which are rehabilitated to be released back into the wild. For the one-third that are too severely injured to be re-released, the Alaska Raptor Center has a Raptors-in-Residence program, where they are used in educational programs at the Raptor Center and in schools throughout the country.

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