THE remote Australian Outback accounts for most of the land mass of the island continent, yet over 90% of Australia’s population lives in and around the coastal cities, primarily in the south and the east. Summer temperatures of 50°C can make the Outback a challenging place to live and work, with most of the employment coming from the ever-growing mining industry.

Tourism is on the rise, however, making the Australian Outback an attractive travel destination for photographers and road trippers.

1. Outback kangaroos at sunset

2. King’s Canyon, Watarrka National Park, Northern Territory

3. Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Central Australia

4. Serpentine Gorge in the West MacDonnell Ranges, Northern Territory, Australia

5. Karijini National Park, Pilbara Region In Northwestern Western Australia

6. Karratha, Pilbara

7. Ayers Rock — Uluru National Park, Central Australia

8. Shire of Derby, West Kimberley, Northern Territory

9. Pilbara, Western Australia

10. Ayers Rock — Uluru National Park, Central Australia

11. Simpson Desert, Central Australia

12. The Bungle Bungle Range, Purnululu National Park, East Kimberley Region

13. Alice Springs, Central Australia

14. Karijini National Park, Northwestern Western Australia