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20 cool cities you should check out before everyone else does

It’s so easy to forget that adventure lies just outside our doorstep. Unfamiliar foods, new customs, rich histories, views for days — just a few hours from home are a dozen different worlds. To get there, you don’t need a car, you don’t need a huge budget, and you don’t even have to do the driving yourself.

Greyhound can take you to cities large and small, not far from where you live and yet still a world away. Probably some you’ve never even considered visiting, by bus or otherwise — until now. We’ve compiled a list of places that won’t be flying under the hype for very long, and in most cases, you’ll be dropped off downtown, in search of your next adventure, limited only by your willingness to dig in and explore. But really, all you have to do is hop aboard.

This post is proudly produced in partnership with Greyhound.

Once an industrial capital of the US — you’ll feel it walking between and stepping into the old brick warehouses around town — Pittsburgh now explodes with color, art, and a foodie scene that would be at home in a city much, much larger.

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Wander along Carson Street, but let your nose do the guiding. And don’t question those french fries on that sandwich — that’s how it’s supposed to be. Note Acacia, its Prohibition-themed cocktails and overall cool vibe, for later. And for “souvenirs?” Wigle Whiskey Tasting Room and Bottle Shop has you covered (you should totally tour the distillery, too).
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The Kimpton Hotel Monaco brings some serious bang for your buck, but what seals the deal is their rooftop biergarten.
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Most Yinzers are dedicated sports fans, art lovers, or both. A quick Uber ride from the Greyhound station, you can catch a Steelers or a Panthers game, hop over to the Mattress Factory contemporary art museum, and then just chill at the super-urban Point State Park. It sits at the confluence of the city’s three rivers, and instead of rolling hills of green, picture lots of bicyclists, wide open views, and a giant, giant fountain.

When you tire of walking one the country’s most impressive beach boardwalks, you’ll find a coastal city ripe with a little bit of everything: local artisans, a mean coffee scene, a storied history, and brunch options that put cities five times its size to shame.

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You gotta nab a Bloody Blue from Bay Local Eatery (google it and see why), coffee from Three Ships, and one of the many ultra-fresh dishes from the “backyard-to-table” Commune.
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Off the Greyhound, you’re a matter of blocks from the beach. There are tons and tons of options here, but the Hilton Virginia Beach Oceanfront will give you a view looking down onto the 34-foot-tall King Neptune statue.
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Before you hit the sand, be sure to check out the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art and the ViBe Creative District (keep an eye out for awesome street art hiding in plain sight). Then it’s miles and miles and hours and hours of sun-and-sand time along the “world’s longest stretch of pleasure beach.” (Don’t believe it? Talk to Guinness.)

When Hamilton chooses a city as small as Greenville, you know something’s afoot. We could attempt to describe why, but the highlights below speak for themselves.

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Here comes the deluge: Jianna is fusion Italian with an amazing atmosphere. Husk Greenville is Sean Brock’s newest restaurant (and the food is as delicious as you might have heard). The steaks are unreal at Halls Chophouse Greenville. Rick Erwin’s West End Grille is a staple. Soby’s is your home for elevated Southern cuisine. Grill Marks serves “freak shakes” and gourmet burgers, and it’s been described as “the greatest place on Earth.” And now you’re starting to understand why Hamilton is here, and why 70,000 locals just can’t get enough.
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The Westin Poinsett is the oldest in Greenville, recently restored to its full glory. If you’re traveling with Fido in tow, check out Aloft — it’s super pet-friendly, hosting a Yappy Hour daily.
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Greenville puts on two major festivals definitely worth checking out: Fall for Greenville highlights all of the city’s restaurants, and Artisphere is where local and regional artists and art-lovers gather for a weekend of performances, local artisan goods, street food, and awesome live music. Another major attraction is the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail, great for a bike ride as it meanders 20-some miles up to Travelers Rest, passing cool local businesses and quiet parks along the way.Speaking of parks, Falls Park is a phrase you’ll hear often on your visit. Events like Shakespeare in the Park and Moonlight Movies happen here, and the Liberty Bridge (a single-suspension cable bridge) will put you in perfect position for the requisite Greenville selfie. And falls? Yep, those too, right in the middle of a downtown that will raise the bar for every other downtown you visit, ever.

Move over, N’awlins. This is the heart and soul of Cajun & Creole country, a side to Louisiana lacking in airs and pretense, but never, ever lacking the flavor. The Hub City is home to the Ragin’ Cajuns, bayou communities, and the second-largest Mardi Gras in the state. It’s America, definitely, but its roots run deep, deep, deep into other cultures — and thanks to its small size, that identity is still well-preserved.

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You’ll find traditional Cajun and Creole here like nowhere else, but what will really get you talking are the places adding their own uniquely modern twists. Grab grits & grillades at Dwyer’s Cafe, oysters at Don’s Seafood, crab cakes at Charley G’s, and, if time allots, definitely try to squeeze in a boudin-making demonstration at Johnson’s Boucaniere.
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Find some true Southern hospitality by staying at a Lafayette B&B. Give Mrs. Rose’s Bed & Breakfast, La Maison de Belle Montgomery, Bordeaux Bed & Breakfast, or Au Bayou Teche Bed and Breakfast a whirl.
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Go on and immerse yourself. Start with a visit to timeless Lake Martin, hitting the waters of this cypress-and-tupelo swamp and bottomland hardwood forest with a guide. Fast forward to the 1800s at Acadian Village — mush it around in your mouth, and you’ll see how the word transformed into “Cajun” — and then get a peek into plantation life at the 1815 Longfellow-Evangeline State Historic Site. You can definitely spot wildlife here, but you could also book it to Zoosiana, a free-range savanna with 130 species roaming wild (okay, okay, this part is timeless, too). Borden’s Ice Cream Shoppe will bring you into the 1950s, red vinyl leather and all, and The Grouse Room and The Wurst Biergarten will escort you swiftly back into the modern, craft-beer era.
Photo Credits: ©Lafayette Travel, ©Marc Broussard/Lafayette Travel, ©Kent Hutslar/Lafayette Travel, ©Danny Culbert/Lafayette Travel

Up north, California gets wild. Sacramento is a confluence, drawing those looking for redwood country, amazingly good coffee and an uber-local foodie scene (they call this America’s “farm-to-fork” capital), a Pony-Express kind of past, and — back in the day — gold. You probably won’t find the shiny stuff anymore, but it might feel like coming close.

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The Greyhound will drop you off not far from downtown, where you’re invited to go nuts. The Sacramento food scene makes the gotta-eat lists of even professional palates — check out Ella Dining Room & Bar, Cafeteria 15L, and know that most spots tout a roster of local wine and beer. The award-winning Bogle Vineyards are just 15 minutes away, too. And oh, the farmers markets!
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If you can, try to nab a hotel on the Sacramento River. The Sacramento Riverfront Promenade is a prime example, adjacent to downtown.
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Go on a scavenger hunt for the city’s street art. Ever since Wide Open Walls — the city’s main art festival — took off, the number of street murals has exploded, growing exponentially every year. Last summer, over 40 sprang up. Consider it Sacramento’s 21st-century gold.
Photo Credits: Jeff Turner, micadew, 12019, micadew

Okay, we’re stretching the limits of “small” in applying the adjective to Jacksonville (yes, it is Florida’s largest city, and the 12th-largest in the nation), but old Jax holds on tight to the hip underbelly of the radar. Part of that has to do with its many identities — the city feels completely different depending on what neighborhood you’re in, much like the boroughs of NYC. For this stop, you’re gonna want some time.

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Creative coastal cuisine is the name of the game in Jacksonville. “Fish camps” are essentially super-fresh seafood restaurants, nad you’ve got to try the local and locally famous Mayport shrimp. This is one of Lonely Planet’s favorite “value destinations,” however, so you know it’s more than just seafood. Head to the Burrito Gallery, Chamblin’s Uptown Cafe, or 13 Gypsies when your seafood quota is met. Post-dinner drinks? There are 20+ breweries and brewpubs in town, keeping every step of the foodie experience Jacksonville-only.
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The Greyhound will drop you off right downtown, next to the St. Johns River. The Omni Jacksonville will get you views of both.
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Before you go brunching, know that the Riverside Arts Market on Saturday mornings under the bridge is the place to be. Then hit up the Five Points and Riverside neighborhoods for their cool and funky shops and restaurants — don’t miss the amazing mostly-weekly Glitterbomb drag shows at Metro Entertainment Complex. And just like the neighborhoods, you’ll find a half dozen distinct beach cultures, from Atlantic Beach to Ponte Vedra. And, yes, you’ve gotta try ‘em all.
Photo Credits: Photo: Rob Bixby, Rob Bixby, Rob Bixby, Jeff Wright

Kansas City is a cultural beacon in a sea of grain. Jazz clubs wail into the wee hours of the morning, the BBQ never stops sizzling, and the arts and culture scene is internationally recognized. Perhaps all this is why locals don the “I heart KC” merch as much as enchanted tourists.

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Sure, 100+ restaurants are dedicated to barbecue, but the “Paris of the Plains” doesn’t put all its eggs in one smoker. Scope out James Beard-nominated Bluestem or The Rieger. Keep it vegan-friendly at Café Gratitude or Eden Alley. See what farm-to-table was like before it was cool at blue bird bistro or The Westside Local. (But if you need your barbecue fix, hit up newcomers Q39 and Char Bar for something totally different.)
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Head west from the station toward the Power & Light District. This is where you’ll find a ton of hotels — like Hotel Phillips Kansas City — but also the city’s famous (and free) streetcar.
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One of the best museums in the country is right here (and the price means you can leave your wallet at home): the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. There’s also the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, the Midwest’s largest farmers market, a thousand jazz clubs (like Green Lady Lounge), speakeasies (like Swordfish Tom’s)…and did we mention this is the “City of Fountains”?
Photo Credits: Photo: David Arbogast / Visit KC, David Arbogast / Visit KC, Visit KC, Ernie Murphy

When three of a city’s claims to fame are chic bars, deep-fried bacon, and fighting the good fight for Civil Rights, you know you’re onto something special. Montgomery is both the first Confederate capital and the birthplace of the Civil Rights Movement. Home to Rosa Parks, Queen Anne mansions, and blues riffs like your grandma couldn’t follow. This isn’t a spot for some run-of-the-mill vacation — here, you have to take the world in.

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Grab some fett sow fries with peach chutney at Central — it’s actually bacon, and you’re welcome. Overlook the Alabama River at Goat Haus Biergarten. Carbload on biscuits at Cahawba House. Chow down on home-cooking from Martha’s Place until you find yourself wanting to roll into a nap on the lawn of the Alabama State Capitol. Yes, feel free to add that to your working itinerary.
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There are plenty of options downtown, but if you’re after some character, check out the Airbnb above the Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum, the period rooms of the Red Bluff Cottage Bed & Breakfast, or sit down to a sweet tea on the wrap-around porch of Hillcrest Manor Bed & Breakfast.
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The way we look at the past is changing, and Montgomery is proudly leading that charge. Check out the brand-new National Memorial for Peace and Justice and its 800+ columns, each representing a US county where a lynching (or lynchings) took place. The Legacy Museum will take you from Frederick Douglass to Donald Glover; Storybooth is a podcast studio, where you can listen to residents’ recollections of the Civil Rights era; the Dexter Parsonage Museum is where the King family lived for a few years in the ’50s — and that’s just a few entries on a long, long list of Montgomery spots every American should visit at least once.After your history lesson, it’s alright to need a drink. In downtown, you’ll find Aviator Bar (just down the block from the Hank Williams Museum, La Salle Bleu Piano Bar, and Sous La Terre (an underground jazz club with music post-midnight). Most of the downtown entertainment district is made up of old river warehouses, so it’s a picturesque spot to be, day or night.
Photo Credits: U.S. Air Force / Trey Ward, Ralph Daily, Soniakapadia

Asheville may be the South’s most booming small town, but it didn’t happen overnight. The cultural and culinary institutions that make it such a hot foodie, music, and beer destination have been decades in the making. Thank the trailblazers, because now you get to enjoy it all.

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The corridor along Haywood Street, connecting West Asheville and the River Arts District, has grown tremendously in recent years. Two bakeries (Hole and Owl) are getting major acclaim, as well as new breweries (Archetype), and restaurants (King Daddy’s Chicken & Waffles). It’s also home to the city’s dankest coffee (Battle Cat).
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The AC Hotel by Marriott puts you in the heart of downtown for a killer price, sandwiched between breweries, restaurants, and local shops.
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Downtown After 5 and Shindig on the Green are summer events stellar enough to plan an itinerary around. But for something every day (or night) of the week, check out The Mothlight and The Orange Peel, two of the city’s best music venues. And if it’s a dive bar you’re after, head back toward Battle Cat. The best one is around here…but you’ll have to find it for yourself.
Photo Credits: Explore Asheville

Coming at you from an Old World fairytale, Savannah is as close as you can get to wandering the streets of Europe without booking that international ticket. Cobblestone streets, centuries-old cemeteries, and picturesque squares stud this highly walkable city, and the nightlife scene? Just stock up on sleep before you arrive.

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Grab a “sandwich” at Zunzi’s, and you’ll understand what those quotation marks are about. Hit up Goose Feathers for brunch, The Shrimp Factory for the obvious and for a Chatham Artillery Punch, or Spanky’s for double-battered and deep-fried spuds (dip ’em in honey).
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Just blocks from the Greyhound station, you’ll find the riverfront. There are plenty of hotels to choose from here — like the Olde Harbour Inn or the Bohemian Hotel Savannah Riverfront.
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Find a park bench and sit underneath the Spanish moss. Window-shop along Broughton Street. Hunt down all 22 of the town squares. Grab a beer and walk around — literally, you’re allowed — the historic district. People-watch and busker-listen in Forsyth Park. Or just head toward the river and follow the noise — Savannah will stay up late with you.

This is one of those cities that manages to stay mellow despite the drama. Drama being a great beer and music scene, some really cool museums, killer chili, and a constantly evolving list of new-school restaurants. If one city on this list really surprises you, it might be right here.

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Over-the-Rhine — a neighborhood — has restaurants and bars on every block. Hit up Senate for gourmet hot dogs, The Eagle for great fried chicken (be sure to drizzle that jalapeno honey on top), Bakersfield for tacos, and City View Tavern for amaaaazing burgers and even more amazing skyline views. Hunting down the aforementioned chili? Skyline is the easiest to find, but Empress is the original.
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The number of hotels you can walk to from the Greyhound station will blow your mind. As you’re strolling, head a bit southwest — that’s where you’ll find the Cincinnatian, catty-corner to photo-worthy Fountain Square.
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Start off at Union Terminal — it’s an incredibly gorgeous art deco building with a natural history museum and an omnimax. Hit up Findlay Market, Cincinnati’s answer to Seattle’s Pike Place. Check out one of the many, many, many parks all over the city, and then? Beer and cocktail time. The most popular craft breweries are Rhinegeist, MadTree, Fifty West, and Taft’s Ale House; Sundry and Vice is good for bourbon and cocktails, as is Longfellow a few blocks away. Did we mention Kentucky is right over the Ohio River? You can smell the bourbon from here.

It would be hard (and a bit sad) to visit Roanoke and not take advantage of its location in Virginia’s Blue Ridge, with access to 600 miles of hiking trails (including some of the most scenic sections of the Appalachian Trail), 300 miles of mountain biking trails, and tons of rivers and lakes for paddling, SUPing, and rafting. But even if you’re keeping it urban, the city has tons to keep you busy.

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The River and Rail is in an old-school pharmacy, only these days you’ll sit down to classic Southern fare on an always-rotating menu. And within walking distance of the Greyhound station, you’ll find four after-dinner stops: Big Lick Brewing, Starr Hill, Soaring Ridge, and Deschutes Brewery Tasting Room. But whatever you do, leave room for Champloo and say hello to hand-rolled Thai ice cream.
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The Hotel Roanoke — right downtown — gets you within walking distance of a number of museums for an outskirts-of-town price.
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Two secs from the station is the Taubman Museum of Art. Once you’re done there, scout out the Roanoke Star, get nostalgic at the Roanoke Pinball Museum inside Center in the Square, or wander Carvins Cove Natural Reserve, Explore Park, or the historic Grandin Village. Grab a bike from Zagster Bike Share, and it’s all doable.
Photo Credits: Sam Dean Photography / Visit Virginia’s Blue Ridge, Taubman Museum of Art / Visit Virginia’s Blue Ridge, ssfaulkn, Dstewart21
Tallahassee is a city all wrapped up in a small-town package. It’s super bikeable, and it won’t take long before you realize the Florida capital is meant to be experienced outside. Cycling trails, outdoor music venues, First Fridays in the Railroad Square Art Park — if it can be done outdoors, it will be.
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Tally has great vegan and locally sourced food — keep an eye out for Sweet Pea, Backwoods Crossing, or The Bark. Gaines Street Pies is another to scope out, their pizzas divided into “heroes” and “villains” (though both using their powers for good!).
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The Greyhound station sits between the Governor’s Walk and Old Town neighborhoods — the Governors Inn or the Hotel Duval will practically be holding a sign with your last name on it once you step outside.
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Try to throw a rock without hitting a trail, park, or farmers market (check out the Frenchtown location and grab some of Marie’s Jelly). The city has a new bikeshare program, and it’s a quick jaunt to other outdoorsy things, too, like the Capital City Amphitheater, springs, and local farms (Jubilee Orchards) for activities like blueberry picking…and eating.
Photo Credits: Ryan Hovatter
It may be a business city on the outside, but a deeper look will show you that the weekend scene is totally mid-renaissance. West Hartford is where you’ll find the best of the city’s shopping, dining, and nightlife, but downtown is right along the Connecticut River, with — in a surprising twist — greenspace galore.
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Republic at the Linden, Porrón & Piña, The Blind Pig, and Chango Rosa are all new(ish) to the scene, drawing buzz around town. You’ll also find nearly every cuisine imaginable — check out Aladdin Halal (Middle Eastern + pizza), Bin 228 (upscale Itlaian + win bar), and The Saigon Kitchen, just to name a few.
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The Greyhounds pull in on the edge of downtown, where your options are nothing short of resplendent. But if you’re looking for something a little more “Hartford,” check out the Silas W Robbins House, a B&B that dates to 1873.
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The Hartford Yard Goats minor league baseball stadium sells out almost every game, and City Steam Brewery Cafe — down the street — gets packed before and after. But to get away from the hustle and bustle, head to Elizabeth Park. Its 102 acres are ideal for walking, jogging, or people-watching, and it’s steeped in those classy New England vibes (think the nation’s third-largest rose garden).

Hollywood South, or so some call it. This is the “other side” of Louisiana, the B side of the record, the kind where you find that one song you’re so happy no one else knows — because it’s all yours.

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Gulf Pig Underground Dinner Club is a must, but no one knows their menu or when they’ll serve next — you gotta get on the email list. For something that’s a little less of a waiting game, here’s your to-eat list: a shrimp buster po’ boy from Herby K’s. A “muffy” sandwich from Fertitta’s. Chicken n’ dumplings from Cotton Boll Grill. A Farmhouse Slang from Great Raft Brewing. And to celebrate, the famous strawberry ice box cake from Strawn’s Eat Shop. (Though you should still sign up for that email list.)
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There are tons of casinos in Shreveport, and many of them have awesome lodging options. Otherwise, check out L’Evangeline Bed & Breakfast or Fairfield Manor Bed & Breakfast to get away from the ding, ding, ding.
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Not far from the Greyhound station — just a few minutes east — you’ll find the Louisiana Boardwalk. It’s 500,000 square feet of outlet shops, restaurants, and boutiques, and it’s great for a stroll, too. Once you’ve conquered that monster, head outdoors: Go fishing on the Cypress Black Bayou, and zipline with (okay, over) alligators at Gator and Friends Adventure Park. Back in town, marvel at the new Shreveport Aquarium and it’s 250+ species swimming above your head. Browse local art at The Agora Borealis, where Shreveport’s creativity comes to a rolling boil. And finally, end the night at The Blind Tiger, an institution you’ll just have to discover for yourself.

They don’t call it North Craftolina for nothing. And in Greensboro, that locally crafted mindset doesn’t start and stop at hops and suds — it includes theatre, sports, museums, and festivals.

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Food? Crafted. Hops Burger Bar. 1618 Downtown. M’Coul’s Public House. Lindley Park Filling Station. Four Flocks and Larder. Beer? Gibb’s Hundred. Joymongers. Natty Greene’s. Pig Pounder. Preyer Brewing. The Bearded Goat. In short, godspeed.
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The Biltmore is a stone’s throw from where you’ll hop off the Greyhound, right in downtown Greensboro.
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The oldest continuously operating dinner theatre (Barn Dinner Theatre), the Carolina Theatre, the Greensboro Symphony, and the Greensboro Opera are all good excuses to pack that cocktail wear — but pack the jerseys, too, as the city is home to a handful of college and minor league teams. And if you’ve got kids in tow, check out the Greensboro Science Center and the Children’s Museum, too.

Taste the Jubilee — where crab and shrimp flood into Mobile Bay’s shallow waters — and you’ll become a seafood snob for life. Soul food plays a prominent role here, too, and it’s not only in the food that you’ll find this unique (and tasty!) crash of cultures.

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The list of hotspots in and surrounding Mobile is long: Dumbwaiter, Panini Pete’s (made-in-house mozzarella), Butch Cassidy’s Cafe, Dragonfly Cafe, Camellia Cafe, and Dauphin’s (the best view onto the bay) are fuel for the palate. The Dew Drop Inn, inspiration for “Cheeseburger in Paradise,” is a downright institution — if you go during an election year, you’ll 100% run into whoever’s on the ballot.
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Downtown Mobile has you covered (Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel, for example), and from here you can rent a boat and hit the bay. Otherwise, keep it boutique-y at the Kate Shepard House Bed & Breakfast, the oldest B&B in the city.
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Fun fact: This is the Louisiana Territory’s original capital. As such, Mobile is steeped in history — think museums (Carnival Museum), mansions (Oakleigh), historic forts (Fort Conde), battleships (USS Alabama), and cathedrals (Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception). Music runs strong here as well — you can see Hank Aaron’s childhood home and the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame, and be sure to check the calendar of music festivals before you plan anything.
Photo Credits: Faungg’s Photos, Pat David, Tad Denson / Visit Mobile

This is where city meets country. Rivers, lakes, and the Ozark Mountains will swamp you with options for hiking, boating, and fishing; three universities and a newly booming downtown set you up for the post-adrenaline come-down. If you can only choose one city, might as well choose Brad Pitt’s childhood home one that gives you a taste of both worlds.

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Druff’s for grilled cheese. Aviary Cafe for crepes. Leong’s, Peking House, or Lucy’s for “Springfield Cashew Chicken.” There are more than a thousand restaurants in this city, leading to the same level of indecision you’ll experience when you decide to hit the trails.
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Only in Springfield would the Best Western be on the National List of Historic Places. Route 66 ran straight through town, and today, if you want to sleep in a pink ’59 Coupe de Ville, you can (google it).
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Mother’s Brewing, White River Brewing, 4 By 4, Lost Signal, and Tie and Timber are all proof of the huge microbrewery surge happening in Springfield. The Queen City of the Ozarks also loves its farmers markets, haunted castles (yep), caverns (double yep), and museums and aquariums. Remind us why you haven’t been here yet?
Photo Credits: SpringfieldMo.org

If there’s one place where your champagne wishes and caviar dreams will come true, it’s West Palm Beach. Celebrities have been flocking here for decades upon decades, and now, in their wake, comes every walk of life. Turns out no one’s immune to the pull of endless sunshine and beautiful beaches — not even the most budget of us travelers.

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E.R. Bradley’s might be the only saloon ever that decided to decorate itself tiki-style. People come from Miami to grab bites at Havana Restaurant. Belly dancing is the appetizer at Leila, followed by some wickedly delish Middle Eastern food. And if nothing else, you have to hit up Sloan’s — it’s a rotating wonder of wonderous ice cream flavors, though keep an eye out for Coffee & Doughnuts…there’s actual Krispy Kremes mixed in.
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Luxury B&Bs and historic inns are the only way to do West Palm Beach — check out Casa Grandview or Palm Beach Hibiscus for a level of cozy and a degree of luxe you’ve probably never seen combined.
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Head toward Clematis Street — that’s the heart of everything, and you’ll be able to tell. Marina views are found near the Flagler end of the street, but shops, restaurants, and bars wind along the whole dang thing. Thursday nights you’ll hear live music coming from Centennial Square, and to get around, hop on Molly’s Trolleys — they’re free. The West Palm Beach GreenMarket — a farmers market — is also here on Saturdays. And if you’ve got a penchant for music festivals, write down “Sunfest.” It’s Florida’s largest waterfront music festival, and it is nothing short of spectacular.

Beer trails and street art — that’s the new Richmond. Virginia’s capital is a true wildcard, a dark horse gaining speed, and you heard about it here first. These are some of the best urban adventures in the US, and a single moment in the city will defy your expectations. Though a single moment will hardly be enough.

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The Brunch Market has a rotating list of vendors. Brunch vendors. And if that somehow doesn’t meet your needs, head to the Scott’s Addition neighborhood. Boulevard Burger & Brew, The Dairy Bar, Fat Dragon, and LUNCH.SUPPER! are just a few of the spots you’ll find there.
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The Clarion Hotel Central is a short jaunt from the Greyhound station, and both are just a few blocks north of Scott’s Addition.
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You’ll have a miserable time at Unhappy Hours at the Edgar Allen Poe Museum (live music, cash bar, museum tours). Then, take the edge off at The Circuit Arcade Bar, River City Roll (a boutique bowling alley), and the Institute for Contemporary Art. That is, if you’ve already navigated the beer trail and spent some green-time on Belle Isle, a 50-acre island with views of the downtown skyline. We’re guessing it will be even better than you’re picturing.
Photo Credits: Visit Richmond VA
This post is proudly produced in partnership with Greyhound.

 


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