One of Yellowstone National Park’s largest geysers put on a show last week. The Giantess Geyser, which throughout its tracked history had erupted between two and six times per year, erupted for the first time in over six years on August 25.

Though it doesn’t erupt often, its bursts can reach heights of over 150 feet and can last up to 48 hours — making Giantess one of the largest geysers in the park. Catching its eruption is something most Yellowstone visitors never experience, so they usually choose to visit consistent performers such as Old Faithful. That said, a handful of lucky visitors stood nearby as Giantess spouted her glory last week, but for those of us not fortunate enough to be on site, the National Park Service caught the eruption on video.

Giantess’ last eruption took place in January 2014, with a three year gap between that and the previous eruption in September 2011.

Yellowstone sits in northwestern Wyoming and stretches into southwestern Montana, attracting more than four million visitors per year to witness its nearly 3 million square miles of forested mountains, wildlife, sulfuric geysers and pots, and a large canyon known as the “Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.”