Photo by Lola Akinmade
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SURE, A SOLID point-and-shoot camera such as the Panasonic Lumix can more than cover your photography needs. However, if you’ve purchased a digital single-lens reflex camera (digital SLR or DSLR), be sure to pick up at least two of the three lenses listed below to get more mileage from your gear.

Telephoto Zoom Lens

 

Your new DSLR camera usually comes with a 18-55 mm kit lens.

While sufficient for most portrait photography situations, within a few months, you’ll notice a hankering for something that can zoom out much further – a zoom lens of sorts.

Lenses such as the 55-200mm pick up where the 18-55 mm lens stops, but a better option is the 18-200 mm telephoto zoom lens which combines both into a single body.

So instead of dragging along two telephoto lenses, you pack only one.

Wide Angle Lens

 

Most professional travel photographers use wide angle lenses and you’ll see why once you try it out.

Wide angle lenses capture everything within your peripheral vision and much more, pulling you right into the midst of the scenery – whether it’s a concert, market scene, or festival.

An affordable ultra wide angle lens is the Sigma 10-20mm, which is at least 60% cheaper equivalent than its Nikkor 14-24mm equivalent.

Can’t tout the benefits of an ultra wide angle lens enough.

Fixed Lens

 

A fixed lens means it doesn’t allow you to zoom in or out. What you see through the viewfinder is what you get.

At under $150, the Nikkor 50mm F/1.8 is the perfect lens for low light situations which do not require flash, such as night photography and dimly lit rooms.

So if you’re heading out at dusk or night, this is the only lens you’ll need to ensure great night photos without using a tripod.

*If your goal is to be a travel photographer, the MatadorU Travel Photography program has the resources you’re looking for.

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