1. Realizing that just because you’re an O’Brien doesn’t mean you deserve free drinks at the pub.

There’s probably at least several others with the same last name as you in O’Malley’s Pub, if the whole family isn’t there. They don’t expect free Guinness and neither should you.

2. Cringing at the idea of singing in public.

You’ll soon find yourself singing along to “Danny Boy” once someone starts it in the pub.

3. Cancelling events due to stormy weather.

You don’t skip the Dublin GAA hurling match at Croke Park just because it’s raining. By the time you finish your fish and chips, it’s most likely to be sunny again.

4. Ordering a pint of Guinness for yourself.

You’ll be kicked out of Mulligan’s Pub faster than the Irish can drink if you order a single pint for yourself. It’s considered very bad etiquette to not buy a round for your group.

5. Not knowing every last detail of the local sports team.

You’ll be expected to wear that green-and-white Limerick jersey with pride and know what happened in the last football game play by play. Don’t forget to have an opinion on Robbie Williams’ performance this season.

6. Expecting to just “drop by” a wedding.

You can plan on your entire weekend being booked with the festivities starting early in the weekend at Doyle’s Pub and ending after the sun has come up on Sunday at the Fitzpatrick Castle Hotel bar.

7. Getting an actual address when meeting someone.

Don’t bother asking for someone’s address because they won’t have one to give you. Just go to Kildimo to say you’re looking for the O’Dooleys and anyone will be able to direct you.

8. Drinking anything other than Guinness.

Don’t even try walking up to the bar to order a Blue Moon. You will drink more Guinness than you’ve ever had in your life, and you will like it.

9. Thinking “It’s just down the road” means just that.

The Irish use this to mean anything from one block to five miles away. Take a few shots of Bushmills at the Shamrock Lodge before you head out and that five-miler won’t seem so bad.

10. Thinking pubs are just for drinking.

The Irish gather at pubs for lunch, before weddings, after funerals. That’s not to say drinking isn’t involved. No matter what the occasion, you’ll still end up stumbling back across the dirt road to your studio above Sean’s house after a good night out.