LAST YEAR was the first time the Australian island of Tasmania cracked the 1 million visitors mark, and only 10% of those tourists were from international locations. Located 240 kilometers south of the mainland, Tasmania is home to just over 500,000 residents, and more than half of of them live in and around the capital city of Hobart. These photos by Mia and Matt Glastonbury show why the visitor numbers to Tasmania is growing every year.

1

Forrester kangaroos can often can be seen fighting, as was the case in this scene from Narawntapu National Park, located in central north coast of Tasmania.

2

Mia Glastonbury modeling at Bridestowe Lavender Fields.

3

Summer rains falling on Mount Rugby, near Bathurst Harbour in Melaleuca, Southwest National Park, Tasmania.

4

Precipitous Bluff overlooking New River Lagoon, Southwest National Park.

5

Mount Wellington in southern Tasmania is a popular place for photographers at sunrise.

6

One of the best possible views of Wineglass Bay is from Mount Amos in Freycinet National Park, on Tasmania's east coast.

7

Sunset from Lindisfarne Bay, located on the River Derwent in southern Tasmania.

8

Sunrise provides some of the best possible light in Tasmania. This early morning photo was captured at Sandy Bay, located on the River Derwent in southern Tasmania.

9

Mia is always happy to put down her camera and literally jump into a photo. This is Forest Lagoon, Melaleuca, located in Southwest National Park.

10

The international space station is seen flying across Bridestowe Estate's Lavender fields located in the central east region of Tasmania.

11

Seagulls on the lookout for food at Constitution Dock in Hobart, Tasmania.

12

Aurora Australis light up over Mortimer Bay in southern Tasmania.

13

Sunset over Deloraine in central Tasmania.

14

June River in southwest Tasmania.

15

Dove Lake shines under moonlight at Cradle Mountain National Park.

16

The journey to Cradle Mountain National Park is one of the best drives in Tasmania.

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Tasmania's fast rivers and green foliage make for some great long exposure photography. Junee River in southwest Tasmania is just one of many places to practice using neutral density filters.

18

The Huon River at Tahune Airwalk in southwest Tasmania.

19

Aurora Australis as seen from the caves at Howrah located just outside of Hobart in southern Tasmania.

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Aurora Australis light up the sky over Eaglehawk Neck's tessellated pavement.

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Cradle Mountain sits behind Dove Lake at dusk.

22

Sunrise over Eaglehawk Neck, in Southeast Tasmania.

23

Painted Rocks at Maria Island, on Tasmania's east coast.

24

Bay of Fires on the east coast of Tasmania often lives up to its name.

25

Mount Wellington Observatory overlooking the Tasmanian capital of Hobart.

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Sunrise over Hobart from Mount Wellington.

27

Sunset over Honeymoon Bay in Freycinet National Park on Tasmania's East Coast.

28

Southern Lights over South Arm in southern Tasmania.

29

Tasmania has some very big wombats.

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Glassy water makes for great reflections for photographers, and luckily, Tasmania has a lot of water.

To see more images from Tasmania, follow Mia and Matt Glastonbury on Instagram.

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