If you’re into sending spicy photos, there’s no shame in your game as long as everyone involved consents. That said, strangers on a plane have not done so. A recent viral TikTok shows a frustrated pilot threatening to get security involved after he found out passengers received unsolicited nude photos before the flight took off.

@teighmars @robloxsouthwestair takes airdropping nudes very seriously. #AEJeansSoundOn #WorldPrincessWeek ♬ original sound – Teighlor Marsalis

The video, posted on August 25 by user Teighlor Marsalis, shows a Southwest Airlines pilot taking passengers to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, who said if the behavior continued that people’s vacations would be “ruined.”

“So here’s the deal. If this continues while we’re on the ground, I’m going to have to pull back to the gate, everybody’s going to have to get off, we’re going to have to get security involved, and [your] vacation is going to be ruined,” the pilot said. “Whatever that AirDrop thing is — quit sending naked pictures, let’s get yourself to Cabo.”

The incident happened while the plane was on the ground but before it pulled out of the gate. A passenger reported the explicit image sent by another passenger to a flight attendant, according to Insider. Marsalis said she also received an AirDrop request but decided to ignore it.

This AirDropping tactic has a name: “cyber flashing.” According to FindLaw, cyber flashing is an all-encompassing term for sending unsolicited explicit photos online, and yes, that includes dick pics. Only Texas and New Hampshire classify cyber flashing as a misdemeanor, while California allows victims to sue if the perpetrator is over 18. Currently, Virginia and New York are working on cyber flashing laws.

The good news is if you are tempted to open AirDropped photos, your phone won’t be hacked. If you want to avoid being AirDropped, the easiest way is to change your settings to only receiving AirDrops from friends or turning it off entirely until you’re ready to use it.