Canadians have been amping up their hardcore ruggedness and tough skin for a few centuries, but the jig is up. The Great White North, as it likes to be called, is actually mostly empty of people because 50 percent of Canadians live in a tiny section of the provinces of Ontario and Québec that includes Toronto, Ottawa, and Montréal.

Youtube channel RealLifeLore tells it like it is, and explains that while most Canadians like to say they live much farther north than most Americans, it isn’t exactly true. About 70 percent of all Canadians live south of the 49th Parallel, the imaginary line that forms most of the border between Canada and the US. Even more upsetting for the Canucks’ image — most Canadians live farther south than all the people who live in Washington, Montana, North Dakota, and, of course, Alaska.

The final nail in Canada’s reputation is the fact that more Americans live north of Canada’s most southern point, i.e. Middle Island, than Canadians. How’s that for a reality check, eh?

Of course, there’s a very good reason for this population repartition: The climate. Most of Canada’s weather is extremely cold and snowy in winter, making for a very difficult lifestyle. According to RealLifeLore, the region that encompasses the cities of Windsor, Toronto, Ottawa, Montréal, and Québec City has richer and deeper soil than anywhere else in the country, allowing for the agriculture needed to feed the population.

But the weather and soil are not the only factors pushing Canadians to huddle around the Great Lakes. Geopolitical and geoeconomic reasons have led many Canadians to live near the long, strategic, and beautiful St Lawrence River.

RealLifeLore’s video has more about Canada’s population distribution. Remember these facts next winter when Canadians try to make you believe they’re tougher than you are.