You thought you were slick telling your boss your all-inclusive resort in the Dominican Republic didn’t have solid Wi-Fi.

“It’s the Caribbean,” you said just before a shoulder-shrug emoji you immediately deleted.

You thought your boss believed you. But the fact is much like stealing paper clips and not leaving a dollar in the break-room soda fund, pretty much everyone is lying about not having Wi-Fi on vacation. Okay, not everyone, but nearly half of American workers have lied to their boss about poor internet access while on vacation. This is according to Allianz Global’s 2019 Vacation Confidence Index, which also found that millennials are the most likely to do this at 59 percent, followed by GenX-ers at 49 percent.

Interesting that the generation most likely to give themselves away by posting vacation pics to their Instagram stories are also the most likely to lie about bad Wi-Fi. But that is neither here nor there.

“Most working Americans feel pressured to spend their vacations attached to their work email, when they may just need a few days to unplug,” said Daniel Durazo, director of marketing and communications at Allianz Global Assistance USA via a statement.

Allianz found nearly two-thirds of working Americans feel the need to check up on the office while on vacation, a phenomenon known as “email creep.” Though fewer than five percent of respondents said this was because their bosses expected them too. And only eight percent said it was because they “feel guilty” about not being online. Which begs the question: Why lie about it?

Most feel the need to creep because they don’t want to return to a quadruple-digit inbox, as nearly a third cited making an easier transition back to work as their main reason for checking emails while on vacation.

Bosses were not surveyed, though given you can literally get usable Wi-Fi in Antarctica now, we can assume they’re like parents who choose to believe their kids’ eyes got so red from a campfire. So go ahead and say you found the only hotel in Scottsdale that doesn’t have high-speed WiFi, you’re far from the only one lying about it. And if it helps you maintain a little work-life balance, your employer probably doesn’t mind all that much either.