When Miller High Life adopted the cheeky moniker “The Champagne of Beers” for its decidedly lowbrow but almost universally beloved beer (after all, it’s the beer of choice at dive bars all over the country), everyone laughed along at the joke. But here is a much more serious proposition for the beer giant: According to a press release and light-hearted ad, Miller High Life hopes to change the official name of its brewery grounds to “The Champagne of Beers Region.”

The new name plays on the fact that true Champagne can only be produced in the Champagne region of France. The brand is encouraging its legions of fans to sign a petition demanding that the brewery location gets similar treatment, and at the same time, it’s on the hunt for its next ambassador.

This ideal candidate should, of course, be a committed and unwavering beer lover. There are serious perks to the job, too: According to Miller High Life, the chosen ambassador will get $20,000, a year’s supply of beer, and a free trip to Milwaukee, where he or she will tour the newly ordained Champagne of Beers Region.

Interested parties can apply between May 6 to May 21, and they should sharpen their writing skills: Applicants must write a short creative essay outlining why they’re the best person for the job. No judgment if you drink a bit while writing to get yourself in the right headspace.

It seems that regular people are being recruited to broadcast their love of American spirits, wine, and beer all over the country. Recently, Murphy-Goode, a California-based wine company, offered a wannabe wine expert-in-training $10,000 a month (and rent-free accommodations) to learn about the Sonoma wine business. Similarly, the Santa Maria Valley launched a program back in February that actually paid tourists to visit the region and enjoy its wineries.

Drinking American-made alcohol has never been so alluring — or lucrative, it seems.