In the Northern Hemisphere, autumn is the time of year we typically associate with fall foliage, a signal that’s it’s time to dig out the overcoat and flannel and make a trip down to the local pumpkin patch. It certainly isn’t the time of year we expect to witness a legendary wildflower display. But for true wildflower enthusiasts, the time is ripe to book a trip down to Australia.

North of Western Australia’s capital city of Perth, stunning wildflower blooms are taking place up and down the region’s Coral Coast. Spectacular shades of yellows, pinks, reds, and whites have taken over Coalseam Conservation Park near the town of Mingenew, with everlastings rolling across the meadows. An hour north, rare wreath blooms showcase their glory outside the small town of Pindar.

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The same is happening further north in Australia’s Lesueur National Park, which sits outside of Jurien Bay. There, you’ll currently find fields of Hakea neurophylla enjoying a late summer bloom and giving way to yellow Hakea eneabba come September. This year’s display is the largest seen anywhere along the Coral Coast in more than 10 years, according to the local tourism agency.

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These stunning blooms offer a firm challenge to commonly-held visions of Western Australia being home to little more than arid outback, desolate desert views, and surfable coastline. In contrast, there are actually over 12,000 species of wildflowers found in the area, half of which only grow in this part of the world.

H/T: Afar

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