Spain just announced that it will open its borders to tourists from outside the European Union and Schengen area on June 30. Spain was one of the countries most severely impacted by the coronavirus, and its imminent reopening is an encouraging sign that the country is getting back on its feet. The announcement shouldn’t excite international tourists too much, however, as the EU is about to issue recommendations for member states regarding which visitors should be allowed to enter.

According to a source from the Interior and Foreign ministries, Spain’s government has not yet made distinctions between which non-Schengen countries should be allowed to enter, meaning that entry rules are still a bit vague. Regular flight routes are also set to be reestablished with countries that have COVID-19 infections under control, but the definition of “under control” remains unclear.

Many Americans are likely wondering if they will be allowed to visit after this June 30 reopening, and unfortunately, the answer isn’t exactly clear. The United States currently has the highest rate of COVID-19 infections in the world, and probably wouldn’t meet any reasonable threshold for bringing the virus “under control” at this time. Draft guidelines from the EU seem to suggest that the US will not be included in this phase of the reopening, but since countries aren’t required to adhere to those guidelines, Spain could theoretically make its own determination regarding US visitors.