People in the US are drinking more wine than ever before — twice as much as in the 1960s, according to the National Institutes of Health. And while Americans are sipping more vino from coast to coast and northern border to southern border, some states are breaking out the bottles more than others.

The NIH compiled data on exactly how much wine each state drinks based on wine sales (which it calls “apparent alcohol consumption for the States”) in 2016, and the results might not be what you’d expect. In terms of pure volume, states with higher population expectedly won out. California, Florida, New York, Texas, and Illinois make up the top five in total amount of wine purchased. The bottom five also followed population numbers: Wyoming, Vermont, Alaska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

The biggest wine-drinking states per capita, however, are a more telling measurement of the nation’s wine consumption habits. On that list, Idaho leads the country by a wide margin, with a consumption rate of 1.19. The next highest is Delaware, at 0.73, followed by New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Vermont. New Hampshire is known for its low alcohol cost, however, and since the data is based on sales numbers, the consumption assumption might be slightly skewed. Meanwhile, West Virginia, Kansas, Mississippi, Utah, and Oklahoma drink the least wine per capita in the country.

VinePair made two handy maps to visualize the data. If your state didn’t make the list, though, don’t feel left out. Even Idaho, the state with the highest per capita number, feels like the numbers can be misleading. A local Boise publication questioned VinePair and the data’s validity on how much wine is really being drunk, quoting one resident who wants to see a Mythbusters-style test — which is fair, but the best available data only comes from sales.

And as Jay Z says: Women lie, men lie, numbers don’t.

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