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Feature photo by SantaRosa OLD SKOOL / Photo above by Rodrigo Solon

Going to Brazil? Here are some Portuguese phrases to memorize before you arrive.

1. Tudo bem?

Photo by Rodrigo Solon

“How’s it going?” (lit. “Everything good?”)

A super-common informal greeting. The correct response is also “tudo bem”.

2. Oí, árbitro! Cadê o penalty?

“Hey, ref! Where’s the penalty?”

A useful phrase to know when traveling to any football-loving country. Shout as needed at the television, radio, or, when possible, the referee himself.

3. Não, não posso faze-lo.

“No, I can’t do it”

Photo by SFMission.com

As my Portuguese professor once explained to me, Brazilians tend to avoid saying no. When they do say no, however, they say it as emphatically as possible. If you really want to be clear, tack on another não to the end of the sentence.

4. Legal

“Cool.”

One of the most useful slang words in the Portuguese language, you can use legal to describe a whole host of things. People can be legal, as can clothes, places, and, ironically, gangster rap.

5. Como? Não falo português europeu.

“Come again? I don’t speak European Portuguese.”

Brazilian Portuguese and European Portuguese are two very, very different dialects. So different, in fact, that Brazilian TV shows are frequently translated and broadcast with subtitles in Portugal.

Even if you already speak Brazilian Portuguese, you’ll probably need some practice before you can understand speakers from Europe or Africa.

Photo by Peter Fuchs

6. Dirige mais rápido, estamos num bairro perigoso.

“Drive faster, we’re in a dangerous neighborhood.”

It’s unfortunate, but Brazil is one of the most unequal countries in the world in terms of income distribution, and most major Brazilian cities have several favelas, or shantytowns.

While the favelas and their residents have made many important contributions to Brazilian society and popular culture, they can also be very dangerous places, especially for visitors.

7. Como vai, gatinha?

“How’s it going, baby?” (lit. “kitten”)

A pretty simple pickup line. I take no responsibility for what happens if you actually try to use it.

8. Que diabo…quem projetou esta cidade? Não faz sentido!

“What the hell…who designed this city? It makes no sense!” (for trips to Brasilia)

Photo by malias

In 1954, Brazil’s government decided that the country needed a new capital. So, they did the logical thing and built a giant, airplane-shaped city called Brasilia in the middle of nowhere.

Oscar Niemeyer was hired to fill Brasilia with unusually-shaped buildings.

9. O Brasil é lindo maravilhoso!

“Brazil is magnificent!”

Lindo maravilhoso is a Brazilian idiom which literally translates to “beautiful marvelous”. You can use this phrase to smooth things over with any Brazilian friends who may have just heard you publicly mocking their capital.

10. É o jeitinho brasileiro.

“It’s the Brazilian way.”

How can Brazil be the world’s largest Catholic country, the world’s party capital, and an industrial giant to boot?

Why did Brazil lay out its capital in the shape of an airplane and stick it in the middle of nowhere?

The answer is simple: É o jeitinho brasileiro.

Attention, Brazilians!

What do you think of the phrases above? How’s the grammar? The author is not a native speaker, so if you notice any mistakes or have other suggestions, please leave a comment below!

Going to Brazil?

Be sure to check out Ernesto Machado‘s excellent article 10 Tips to Improve Any Trip to Brazil.

Finally, for the tragic story of the Brazilian boy whose smiling face illustrates our Community Connection to Brazil graphic, click over to Beija Flor’s Brazilian street kid gallery on Matador.

Language Learning


 

About The Author

Adam Roy

Born and raised in Chicago, Adam Roy is a travel writer, avid scuba diver and aspiring renaissance man. For more of Adam's writing, visit his blog at www.illadvisedadventures.com.

  • http://gangsofbangs.blogspot.com Luiz

    Hi, I’m brazilian. Good article, and the phrases are pretty much correct (lot of laughs on number 6)! But Brasília, Brazil’s capital, is NOT in the middle of the Amazon! It’s way below!

    • http://matadortravel.com/travel-community/rsw Tim Patterson

      Thanks for the correction, Luiz!

  • http://www.fluentin3months.com Benny the Irish Polyglot

    Excellent post!! :) I’ll add a couple of my favourites:
    * Que droga!! (What a shame/annoyance, also “What the hell..” NOT talking about drugs)
    * Que saudades! Hard to translate; “I miss him/it/her/them so much” sometimes works. I hear this AAAAALL the time from Brazilians in Europe talking about their homeland :P
    * Cara – Dude (not so much “face” in Brazil, as Spanish learners would think; for that say “rosto”)
    * O meu coração é tão feliz! – My heart is so happy! I love this one. If you’re so happy (usually from love), then your heart is actually what is happy.
    * Nossa!! – Wow!! (short for “nossa senhora” – our lady, but used literally just to say “our!” for amazment at anything)
    * Cadê – this one was mentioned in the post, but is good to know for those who think that Spanish and Portuguese are so similar. “Onde está” (where is), is more informally rendered as cadê (this includes the verb). Cadê você? Where are you, etc.

    • http://matadortravel.com/travel-community/rsw Tim Patterson

      Thanks for the additions, Benny!

    • AG

      I think “Tipo Assim” is the most common expression of all times, especially among under 30′s. It can be translated by “Like This”

      I’m Brazilian, and yes I type with the “Z” ’cause I’m writing in English.

      XX

  • http://www.portugalholidaystips.com Tips for Holidays in Portugal

    Hi,
    I’m from portugal and obviously i speak the European Portuguese. Point number 5 is completely false. I agree that the construction of the phrases are a little different and the accent too, but any portuguese understand Brazilian portuguese. The Brazilian TV shows in Portugal, never had to be translated, much less subtitled. I do not know where you get or who say to you such a thing. :)

    • http://matadortravel.com/travel-community/rsw Tim Patterson

      Good to know, thanks for commenting.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com Benny the Irish Polyglot

      I have to agree here, I don’t know where the writer got the idea that Brazilian Portuguese would ever need subtitles or even be translated to European Portuguese. The very idea is ridiculous :P
      On the other hand, the reverse is not so clear. Brazilians have a hard time understanding the Portuguese; I have Brazilian friends who were finding it so hard to understand the locals that they had to use ENGLISH when travelling through Portugal… the Portuguese accent and different words is quite tricky to understand for Brazilians.
      People travelling to Portugal should note that many things in this post (and in my comment above) just won’t work there. (It’s like me suggesting someone say “Dude” in Ireland)

      • http://www.portugalholidaystips.com Tips for Holidays in Portugal

        I agree. The Brazilians really have some difficulty in understanding the European Portuguese.
        In part, this is because there are very few or none European Portuguese TV shows in Brazil, while in Portugal there were always Brazilians TV shows, at least since I remember. Due to this factor we have some advantage over the Brazilians.

      • Marcinha

        I agree and it happened to me! I had to speak English with a clerk at the airport in London because I couldn’t understand his Continental Portuguese accent because I am Brazilian. I was totally embarrassed!

  • http://musictravelwrite.wordpress.com Michelle

    I’m sure it depends on where you are. I tend to think of it as UK/US English differences. Sure, it’s all the same language, but I’ll admit when I was in Scotland I didn’t totally understand everyone- and my family’s Scottish!

    I love this article. :) A few to add…

    “Que porra!” What the f***? The crowd at the football game I went to in Salvador taught me this one well.

    Sometimes “abacaxi” is used to describe a tough problem. Which is funny, because abacaxi is pineapple. Maybe it’s like the idiom “what a pickle…”

    My personal favorite (this is unique to Salvador):

    “O pai, o!” (Oh pah-ee oh!)

    The ultimate slang, so famous they’ve named a movie after it…it’s actually “olha para isso, ohla”, (“look at this, look”), but seriously slurred and shortened. It’s often used to say “told you so.” Yell “O pai, o!” in Salvador and you’ll crack people up!

    • http://matadortravel.com/travel-community/rsw Tim Patterson

      I like the pineapple phrase.

      • peter

        I’m married to a girl from Sta Catarina and worked there several years. My mates there explained it this way. It such a problem/annoying thing that you only want to stick it ‘where the sun don’t shine’ – but it just won’t fit….

  • http://www.illadvisedadventures.com Adam

    Thanks for the comments, all! As for the subtitles thing, I know that the reverse is true (European tv shows being brought to Brazil. I must have assumed that it worked both ways…appreciate the correction, though.

    I remember the first time I heard a Portuguese speaker stick their pronoun in the middle of their verb (“ir-me-ei encontrar com ele”). Confused the hell out of me.

  • Bea

    “Você manda bem!” – “You did well!” For emphasis, “Você manda bem pra caraca!”

    “Porra” is a gem. So is “viado” which is another word you’ll hear at a football game. It means ‘homosexual’ but between friends it can be a term of endearment.

    “Fique tranquilo” – Relax! No worries.

    My girlfriends and I use “safadinha” to tease each other (it means “naughty little girl”).

    “Fala!” – Speak! A way to say hi, too.

  • Mike

    brazucas (brazilians) love to interject ”po” (short for porra, which can mean either shit, semen, crap, etc.) at the beginning or end of sentences as a form of exclamation, for example: ”po mano, ta me zuando” – ”are you making fun of me bro?”. but you can use it almost all the time when ur angry/annoyed/surprised etc.

    then there is ”falou” (ok/see ya), ”valeu” (cheers/thanks/bye), ”demorou” (ok, yes for sure, etc..), all used daily

    and of course swear words like caralho, puta que pariu, fudeu mermao, etc. etc. but its best not to go throwing them around till u have a better grasp of the language!

  • Adam Roy

    Man, I really hope this doesn’t end up turning out to be some kind of Portuguese-language “Engrish”. I love the language, but I’m no master of it.

  • http://eyesonbrazil.com Adam

    Hm, I would say that 2, 3, 5, and 8 aren’t so useful. Interestingly enough, Portuguese for Dummies did a great job at the end of their book where they go over 10 very Brazilian phrases. Perhaps using Google Books, it can be viewed online.

    I’m not a native speaker but I’ve spent 8 years studying the language and consider myself fluent. Half on this list, I never heard anyone actually say.

    On 3, it’s more common to hear “Não dá” (basically, “it’s not possible”) than “Não posso fazê-lo” (fazer when followed by lo or la, requires the “chapeuzinho”, or little hat, over the ‘e’). If around friends, you could say “nem fudendo” but I wouldn’t suggest it until you know the people very well.

    On 5, you might want to change “Como?” to “Oi?”. People with a background in Spanish tend to use “como?” in this way when in Brazil, when Brazilians say “Oi?”

    On 10, Brazilians tend to leave off the “brasileiro” part of the phrase and simply refer to it as “jeitinho”.

    Regards

  • Hadassa

    About number 5, I’m a brazilian, I have studied 6 months in north of Portugal.
    The portuguese (BR) and the portuguese (PT) can have different syntax, sometimes. For instance, “me dá” (BR) and “dá-me” (PT), what it’s meaning “give me”. Besides, there are different accents of portuguese: the portuguese in Lisboa is differently spoken from the spoken portuguese in Braga. Definitely! Of course, the same happens in Brasil: spoken portuguese in south is different from that spoken one in north. We have still differences on phonetic sounds. Sometimes, portuguese people don’t pronounce all “e” when they speak, like brazilian people don’t pronounce all “r” when they are placed at the end of words, as well.
    And yes! If you go to the cinema in Portugal, you can find brazilian movies with subtitles. To understand portuguese – as it is spoken in different countries or in different regions in the same country with a new lexicon, phonology and syntax -, do we need practice? Yes, maybe! It depends on the place. But we get used to this “new” portuguese in a couple of weeks.

  • Sofia

    anyone know a private brazilian portugese tutor? or a class i can take in the LA area?

    thanks, please contact: sofialiu1@gmail.com

  • Cristiano

    Yes, there is no Portuguese TV shows in Brazil, so you Portuguese do have an advantage over us Brazilian. But I’ve talked to Portuguese before and of course we could understand each other. There’ll always be some idioms problems going on though. Mainly just created words, like internet words, which in Portugal are literally translated to Portuguese, as mouse (rato) and site (sítio) that in Brazil we would maintain in English. But I really think that a person that speaks Brazilian Portuguese as a second language will have a hard time understanding European Portuguese.

  • Grasa

    I must be from another world…

    Seriously, why is that I do not understand European Portuguese from Portugal, when I was born and educated in Brazil? I believe it is also mutual, as several Portuguese people I worked with, including from Azores and Mozambique, requested that the courts bring an European speaking Interpreter… Based on my personal experience, I have to disagree with some coments here, and indeed, aside from the diferences in the written format, the European accent is really a killer to my ears to understand. I would have to ‘cut corners’ to say that I can follow what they say…so, Adam, you did a good job there!

  • Pingback: How To Couchsurf Carnaval in Brazil

  • Nazaré

    I´ll just leave another cool phrase: show de bola. We say it when someone does something well done!

  • Jordanacris

    Hi! I’m Brazilian. And I found number 8 so trully funny!!  :D 
    Brasília makes no sense at all!! When I first visited the city with my family, I simply hated! Sure, there are some cool stuffs there; but we had a hard time trying to find the place where we were supposed to go. I am not saying that is a BIG GIANT MESS. No. I just found very different the WAY that things are organized over there (streets, blocks, buildings…).

    Also, I do NOT speak english. ‘Google Translate’ helped me. That said, sorry for  any grammar mistakes.    ^^

  • bucho

    One I picked up while living near Belem, in the Amazon, was “So o creme”, meaning literally  “only the cream”.

    It’s used to mean “everything is good” or “only the best” due to the notion that the cream is the best part of the milk. Kind of like the way we have the phrase in English “the cream rises to the top” when talking about how the best (athletes, students) rise to the top.

  • Paulo Arthur

    Great expressions.. but watch out for the 7th expression.. You  usually say it for aqcuaintance! Sorry for my bad english. I’m from Brazil

  • Rodrigotebaldi

    You forgot about the most important word in Brazil: Porra. It has as many uses as the f. word. Use it at anytime you want to say the f. word, and watch as every single Brazilian around you starts to like you

  • Chris

    I learned European Portuguese, and it took me forever to be able to communicate and understand Brasilians, lots of hours spent interacting with several different ones over the course of the past year, getting to know their peculiarities and all.

    Como vai isto? is pretty common for Brasilians (another way of saying tudo bem), estou gozando com a sua cara is a personal favorite (I am messing around with you), and porra is common in Portugal as well, not just Brasil. Also handy: when we in English say something, and end it with “got it?” or “you know?” Brasilians say “entendeu?”

  • Rafael

    This site is quite good. It has only a few mistakes only natives would find:

    In the second sentence: “Oí, árbitro! Cadê o penalty?”, Brazilians say “Ei, juíz! Cadê o pênalti?”
    We refer to the referee as “juíz” (lit. judge).

    In the third sentence: “Não, não posso faze-lo.”, Brazilians say “Não, não vai dar pra fazer.”

    In the fifth sentence: “Como? Não falo português europeu.”, Brazilians say “Quê? Não falo português de Portugal.”
    We refer to “European Portuguese” as “Portuguese of Portugal.”

    In the sixth sentence: “Dirige mais rápido, estamos num bairro perigoso.”, Brazilians say: “Anda mais rápido, a gente tá num bairro perigoso.”
    Even though you are in a car and you need to use the verb “dirigir” (to drive) we prefer using “andar” (lit. to walk). We also love using third person.

    The rest is correct and really quite hilarious!

    P.S.: I’m Brazilian

    • http://twitter.com/ElFuegoDelToro El Fuego Del Toro

      if you were brazilian you wouldn’t spell it with a Z

      • Danilo Souza

         If he were typing in Portuguese he would spell with “s”, but since I were typing in English have to spell with “z”.

    • Theboss8

      Thanks again!

    • cladovalle

      Everything Rafael said here is correct, but I’d like to add one more: as a woman, if a stranger calls me “gatinha”, I wouldn’t like it one bit hahaha.

      Just relax, say “Tudo bem?”, intruduce yourself and ask her name :)

      Oh, and one more: we don’t usually say “que diabo”, either. We say “que porra é essa?” (which would translate as “wtf”) or, if we don’t wanna be rude, “que isso?” suffices.
      ps> I’m Brazilian as well!

  • http://twitter.com/ElenaComo Elena Como

    I’d add “tudo azul!” (everything is blue) which means that all is well.

    And perhaps “vai ver se estou na esquina” (go see if I’m on the corner) which I heard in a song and really like.

  • Vhbrait

    You were great. I’m a native speaker and I liked your phrases.

  • guest

    But Rafael is right about the phrases in his comment above.

  • Danilo Castro de Souza

    At the number 3, would be bether say.
    Não, não posso fazer isso. ( No, I can’t do it)
    Or
    Não, assim não dá. (No, not like this)

    • Dogshit

      or just say Não. This article is dog shit

    • Ericdavis55

      Yeah you really never use pronoun connections like “fazê-lo” in Brasil…you’re only gonna see that in books or written somewhere formal

  • Ewrang2000

    really rubbish about brazilian portuguese and portuguese being that different and i haven’t in my years of living in Portugal never  seen brazilian telenovelas with subtitles…its just a matter of recognizing the accent and learning a few words that are different

  • Melody Chang

    how do you pronounce these phrases?

  • Theboss8

    Thanks for the phrases! Really useful for my project!

  • Renata

    Are you kidding with me? I am Brazilian and I never used these phrases!

    • Marco

      So help make them better…

    • Felipe

      You most definitely have said “legal” at a minimum 4 million times in your life. It’s like the most common word in Brazil other than like tudo bem

    • Luís

      vc nunca usou legal nem tudo bem? onde mora????

  • Dogshit

    My girlfriend who is Brazilian says this article is dog shit.  

    • Danilo Souza

       Really? I am brazilian also and I don’t thing it is a dog shit.

  • Marco

    I am also Brazilian and second Rafael’s post. I would also add that saying “O Brasil 
    é lindo maravilhoso” is like saying “Brazil is beautiful wonderful.” In other words, choose either “lindo” or “maravilhoso,” or at least separate it with a comma! Great effort however, congrats! Welcome to Brazil ;)

  • Teste

    It is not correct , in portugal we don´t put subtitles on brasilian shows . May be the opposite , the brasilians have some difficult understand portuguese from portugal.

  • Jonas Stephani

    Nice post!
    I’m a native speaker, and I would say that 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 would hardly be said by a Brazilian. Instead one would say:

    2 – Filho the puta! Foi penalti!
    3 – Não, não posso or Não, não dá (para eu/mim fazer) eu fazer is the grammatically correct, but most Brazilians would say “mim fazer”.
    6 – Vamos! Acelera aí porque a barra é pesada!
    7 – Como vai filé? – I think “filé” is more common than “gatinha” and fits both male and female.
    8 – Que merda! O que que é isso (quê qué isso).

    the answer for “Tudo bem” can be just “Tudo” as well. People are saying a lot of “Tudo mara” as well. (because of a TV show that was aired 2/3 years ago).

    As said before “Como” can be replaced by “oi”, “repete”, “Que (quê)”. It all depends where in Brazil you are…

    • Otavio Gouveia

      “Como vai filé? ”

      Em que lugar se fala isso pelo amor de Deus? hahaahahhahaha

      So se for em Minas…

      Eu acho que falam mais: E ai gostosa?

      LOL

    • Jonas Stephani

      lol Everything started in Rio lol

    • Jonas Stephani

      E mais… Minas o povo é mais recatado! lol “E aí gostosa” já tem que ser íntimo! haha

    • Ronaldo Soares

      - It was forgotten to explain that “barra pesada” is used for more other cases to a difficult situation like a “catch-22″. The meaning of this example is specific.
      - “Filho da puta” and “Que merda” are inadvisable and bad expressions. Let us avoid to use them.
      - I’m Brazilian native speaker and I had never heard this strange “Tudo mara” and “como vai, filé?” (?!!!)…

  • G Bruce Cutting

    what does Mas que Nada translaste to?

    • Ben Bergman

      more than nothing

    • Ronaldo Soares

      No. It means “but, what a thing!”, an insignificance, a nonentity. It’s an expletive expression of anger or impatience, so it has a negative meaning.

  • Ronaldo Soares

    Some suggestions:
    - Point 2: “Ei, juiz! Cadê o pênalti?”. It’s the correct form to say it in Portuguese.

    - Point 5 is absolutely false! There is not difficult to a Brazilian understanding European Portuguese. It’s like different accents between American and British English. Portuguese and Brazilians understand each others very well. It is the SAME LANGUAGE.
    Portuguese and Spanish are DIFFERENT LANGUAGES.

    - It’s great using:
    “cara” (informal referring to a man, a lad, a guy) and.
    “Cadê?” /kah-deh/ (or “onde está?”) (where is at?).

    - Point 9: please, choose only either “lindo” (beautiful) or “maravilhoso” (marvelous).

    - “Assim não dá.” (it does not work like this).

    And a very-very important phrase to use in Portuguese, to bartenders:
    - “Dá uma caipirinha aí!” (give me a “caipirinha” /ky-pee-reen-a/).

    • Carol Martins

      “There is not difficult to a Brazilian understanding European Portuguese. It’s like different accents between American and British English.” Não MESMO, não só o próprio acento, mas o significado diferente das palavras em comum também torna o Português europeu BEM difícil de ser entendendido. Pelo menos para mim e mais 12312421431 pessoas que eu conheço.

    • Carol Martins

      Ops, *sotaque, não acento haha.

    • Ronaldo Soares

      The fact is that Portuguese is ONE language, and it’s true. It may be that you have not more contacts or conversation with Portuguese-speaking Europeans.
      Differences in accents and in word meaning are normal, even between American and British English. Even inside the Portuguese among Brazilian regions and among Portuguese regions.
      But it’s THE SAME LANGUAGE.

    • Lara Rios

      Carol Martins exatamente! eu, particularmente, nao entendo quase nada daquele portugues doido de portugal..

    • Lara Rios

      Carol Martins exatamente! eu, particularmente, nao entendo quase nada daquele portugues doido de portugal..

  • Pablo Trobo

    More than anithing, with the connotation of impatience as in “First of all!” in a sentence witha demanding bent. Losely translated, the song mas que nada by Jorge Benjor goes: ” First of all, get of the way because I want to dance the samba…”

    • Ronaldo Soares

      Let us clear this subject:
      In Portuguese, “MAS” is different than “MAIS”.
      “MAS” = but, however, yet, even.
      “MAIS” = more.
      We do not confound!
      —– “More = más” is SPANISH, NOT PORTUGUESE! —

  • Maria Luiza

    2) “Oi, árbitro!” -> “Po, juiz!”

    3) “Não, não posso faze-lo.” -> “não vai dar, não”, “não posso, não”.

    5) ” Como?” -> “Oi?”, “Quê?”, “Ahn?”

    7) “Como vai” -> “E aí”.
    “como vai” can also be used, but “e aí?” is more common.

    8) “Que diabo” -> “que inferno”.

  • Sérgio Henrique Lopes Cabral

    Brazilians do not need subtitle for watching a Portuguese program. It is not true.

  • AJ Seyam

    On number 6, the translation was not direct. Estamos would mean we are all because it generally applies to a group three or more.

    • Ronaldo Soares

      “Nós estamos” has strictly the same meaning as “we are”. “We” (or “nós”) is plural, applied to more than one person (with the person who is speaking): it means, two or more.

  • Patricia Crowley

    while watching brazil play japan on tv last night I heard the commentator say a particular brazilian saying which roughly translated meant ‘swallow a chicken!’ did I hear that right?

    • Priscila Zanuzzo

      That’s right. “Tomou um frango” is used when a player has the ball passed under their legs as another player carries it towards the goal. (or basically dribbles which make the adversary look like a fool)

  • Patricia Crowley

    while watching brazil play japan on tv last night I heard the commentator say a particular brazilian saying which roughly translated meant ‘swallow a chicken!’ did I hear that right?

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Vanessa Hakim

      You are right. Brazilians say it when for example the goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a very lousy mistake

    • Captain Obvious

      I wonder if you are right. Would a Brazilian say it perhaps when a goalkeeper suffers a goal by doing a lousy mistake?

  • Patricia Crowley

    while watching brazil play japan on tv last night I heard the commentator say a particular brazilian saying which roughly translated meant ‘swallow a chicken!’ did I hear that right?

  • Khawaan

    Oi: what does “tudo joia,” mean?

    • cladovalle

      It means the same as “tudo bem?”; but that’s sort of an “old” slang. Like, my dad would say it; I wouldn’t.

  • k9gardner

    Everyone I know answers “tudo bem?” with “tudo bom.”

  • Sarah Shaw

    “So different, in fact, that Brazilian TV shows are frequently translated and broadcast with subtitles in Portugal.” Not true!!! I’ve been living in Portugal for the last 15 years and I’ve never once seen a Brazilian TV show subtitled. Most Portuguese can perfectly understand Brazilians.

  • José Nogueira

    “Brazilian Portuguese and European Portuguese are two very, very different dialects. So different, in fact, that Brazilian TV shows are frequently translated and broadcast with subtitles in Portugal.” – That’s not true. I’m portuguese and in my country Brazilian TV shows are not translated nor broadcasted with subtitles. Portuguese people undestand fully well “brazilian portuguese”.

  • André O.

    That one about Brazilian TV Shows being “often” subtitled in Portugal is not correct… All Brazilian “soaps” (novelas), and movies that I’ve seen in Portugal are not subtitled. There is in fact some dialects that are harder to understand and only in the news they actually use subtitles… But for that, also some dialects from Portugal are sometimes difficult to understand and as well, in the news they use subtitles. But these are exceptions.. Normally we don’t need subtitles to understand what our brothers from the other side of the Atlantic say.
    The opposite case does not happen so well… I’ve had that experience personally, that sometimes the Brazilian don’t exactly understand what we Portuguese say, although both us use the same language. It is sometimes a question of accent and sound. If we, Portuguese, start to speak with a little bit of “Brazilian accent” than the Brazilian can understand us.

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