← Mexico City

If you have 48 hours in Mexico City, you’ll have spent day one hitting up all of the major tourist attractions in Centro Historico, so day two is a little more offbeat. You’ll spend the day hanging around Roma and Condesa, two of the city’s hippest and most culturally active neighborhoods. And don’t forget to dedicate part of your day to the most important museum in the whole of Mexico, the impressive National Museum of Anthropology.

Breakfast

Photo: Panaderia Rosetta/Facebook

Start your day in Panadería Rosetta on Colima street, one of the best options for freshly made bread and a good cup of coffee in Roma. If you want to grab a snack for later, look for one of Mexico City’s famous tamales stands. You’ll most likely find one near a convenience store if it’s still early in the morning.

Roma

Photo: Kamira/Shutterstock

Walk at your leisure around La Roma. You’ll spot great street art, galleries, cafes, and boutiques all around. One of the most interesting streets is Orizaba, which connects Rio de Janeiro Square and Luis Cabrera Park, two of the best spots to hang out and admire the turn-of-the-century architecture this neighborhood is famous for. Next to Rio de Janeiro Square, you’ll spot a shop by the famous candy makers of Dulcería de Celaya. From here, you can follow Durango street up to La Romita, one of the oldest public squares in Mexico City, famous for its 16th-century chapel and street-art-packed allies. It’s also known for being the scenery of a famous Luis Buñuel film, Los Olvidados.

La Roma is one of the most bike-friendly neighborhoods in Mexico City. Most hostels in the area will lend you bikes, but you can also rent one through EcoBici, the main bike rental system in Mexico City.

Lunch

For lunch, stop at Mercado Roma on Querétaro street, just a block away from Insurgentes Avenue. This restored market is now a gourmet food court with options for every single taste. Don’t leave the place without tasting a few chocolates at QUÉBO! Here, you’ll find chocolate versions of a lot of traditional Mexican meals and desserts.

La Condesa

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On the other side of Insurgentes lies the La Condesa neighborhood. Start your tour of this colorful area in Parque México then head north towards Parque España. Michoacán and Amsterdam are the two main streets here and the ones you should favor to make the most out of your walk. Once in Parque España, visit the rooftop of Condesa DF Hotel and grab a drink while you enjoy the view of Condesa and neighboring Chapultepec Forest.

Chapultepec Forest

If you’re already acquainted with EcoBici, grab a new bike to make your trip more efficient. You’ll go through the same gates you passed on day one, but this time you’re going to forget the castle and follow the signs for the National Anthropology Museum. On your way, you’ll pass through the Chapultepec lake, the city zoo, and the Fountain of Nezahualcóyotl.

National Museum of Anthropology

Photo: ChameleonsEye/Shutterstock

This is one of the most important museums in Mexico, and its collection of Mesoamerican artifacts and art pieces has no equivalent. The place is huge, and going through it all requires a whole day. Since you only have the afternoon, focus on the main floor, and take your time exploring the Aztec room, easily the highlight of the whole museum.

Back to La Roma for dinner and drinks

Photo: Fonda Fina/Facebook

Exit the forest via Chapultepec Avenue and you’ll be back in la Roma in no time. Once there, head to the Cibeles Fountain, where you’ll find plenty of options to dine and party. Just a block away from the fountain square is Fonda Fina, a trendy version of Mexico’s more traditional eateries, or fondas. Here, you can enjoy upscale versions of Mexican classics like chapulín tostadas (grasshoppers) along with vibrant cocktails made with local ingredients like grapefruit and avocado.