As preserving nature is important in the fight against climate change, Norway is taking it to the next level by creating 10 new national parks. The country is to create four new parklands, upgrade six landscape conservation areas to national parks, and expand eight national parks that are already designated.

“Loss of biodiversity due to development and intervention is one of the biggest challenges in the world, but also in Norway, this bit-by-bit development is taking on more and more nature. Therefore, the government now wants to initiate more protection processes where both the local municipalities and the Norwegian Environment Agency recommend that a national park be built,” said Minister of Climate and the Environment of Norway Sveinung Rotevatn in a press release.

The four new national parks will be Hornelen in Bremanger, Masfjordfjella in Masfjorden and Alver, Øystesefjella in Kvam, Samnanger and Vaksdal, and the Sunnmøre Alps in Ørsta. These locals will join several national parks and UNESCO World Heritage Sites already located throughout the country.

The expanded national parks will include Rohkunborri, Blåfjella-Skjækerfjella, Skarvan-Roltdalen, Femundsmarka, Dovre, Jostedalsbreen, Jotunheimen, and Raet. Jotunheimen National Park, already well known by international visitors contains the tallest mountains in Norway, as well as Northern Europe’s highest peaks — the Jotunheimen mountain range.

“The national park status is the foremost quality mark we can give a piece of Norwegian nature. That an area becomes a national park means that [it] has very special natural values ​​that we believe it is especially important that Norway protects and takes care of for the future,” said Rotevatn.