ESTABLISHED IN 1919, GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK now sees almost 5 million visitors every year. The canyon is more than 5,000 feet deep and 10 miles wide at its narrowest point. Most people don’t travel below the rim. Don’t make that mistake.

1

Sunset:

Lipan Point is one of the eastern-most viewpoints in the Grand Canyon. The broad expanse of the eastern canyon spreads out below.

2

Hikers:

What goes down must come back up. Hiking into the canyon is the best way to experience the Grand Canyon. Hikers have a greater respect for the true size of the canyon after hiking down thousands of feet to get a new view of the inner canyon.

3

Bright Angel Creek:

Bright Angle Creek is a thin ribbon of greenery in an otherwise dry desert environment.

4

Milky Way:

There are no major cities near the canyon so light pollution is minimal. Camping in the canyon provides one of the best displays of the night sky anywhere in the United States.

5

Lizard:

Even though the temperatures of the inner canyon are unbearable for humans during the summer months, wildlife such as this horned lizard, thrive in the desert heat.

6

Photographer:

Widforss Point along the North Rim of the canyon has great sunset views and no crowds.

7

Creek/River:

Barring a major rainstorm, most side streams in the Grand Canyon are crystal clear. The contrast is apparent when they reach the muddy Colorado River at the bottom of the canyon.

8

Blue Hour:

After a long day of intense heat and a dramatic sunset the canyon seems to breathe a sigh of relief after the sun goes down and darkness slowly envelopes the canyon.

9

Sunrays:

From the South Kaibab Trail the sun rises through the smoke from forest fires throughout the west.

10

Sunset Tree:

After the sun sets, light from glowing clouds is spread throughout the immense eastern Grand Canyon.

11

Viewpoint:

The north and south rims of the Grand Canyon are littered with viewpoints. While still beautiful at midday, sunrise and sunset are the key times to enjoy the best light along the rim of the canyon.

12

Condor:

There are 73 condors in the Grand Canyon region. Often confused with vultures because of a similar head and wing shape, Condors have a gigantic wingspan of up to 10 feet. Keep your eyes peeled on the South Rim and western reaches of the canyon to spot one.

13

Storm:

In late summer daily thunderstorms provide a brief respite from the heat and dominate the sky with thunder and lightening.

14

Roaring Springs:

Roaring Springs on the North Rim provides drinking water for all of Grand Canyon National Park.

15

Agave:

Utah agave, also called century plants, live for years and only bloom once before they die.

16

Grandview Point:

The Kaibab rock formation dominates the south rim of the Grand Canyon. Water pockets, like these at Grandview Point, hold water after late summer storms for rodents and other wildlife along the rim.

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