A journey to Nepal to walk among the world’s highest mountains is a dream for many travelers.

Photo by Eric Lon

And, upon arriving in Kathmandu, many realize that such a trip really is like a dream: Disorienting, chaotic, confusing, and dizzying. Sorting out itineraries, finding the best gear, acquiring the necessary permits, and hiring a trustworthy guide or porter are difficult tasks to complete on the busy streets of Thamel.

Distractions from touts and other travelers abound, and rumors of weather conditions, permit situations, Maoist activity, and thefts circulate continuously.

It quickly becomes clear that simply getting to Nepal is the easy part. Organizing your trek and pulling it off safely and successfully requires foresight, planning, and preparation.

Nepal: Trekking and Climbing, 25 Classic Treks and 12 Climbing Peaks is an excellent resource for that planning stage.

With beautiful photographs, color maps, and detailed information about Nepal’s most popular and least traveled trekking routes, the book helps would-be trekkers prepare for their dream trip.

From adequate albeit brief introductory sections on Nepal’s history and culture, to special features on low-impact trekking and mountain photography, Nepal: Trekking and Climbing has all the requisite introductory information in addition to detailed overviews of 25 outstanding treks.

The best part of this book, however, is the treatment it gives to less-traveled routes and regions.

Of the nearly 100,000 people that apply for a trekking permit in Nepal each year, most of these people, as many as 60 percent, head into the Annapurna region to complete the classic Annapurna Circuit, the trek into the Annapurna Sanctuary, or any number of other shorter treks in the area.

Of the remaining trekkers, 17 percent visit the Everest region and 13 percent visit the Lantang region.

This means that only 10 percent trek in all other parts of the country.


Photo by Eric Lon

While Nepal: Trekking and Climbing covers the classic Annapurna, Everest, and Lantang treks extensively, it also details treks like the Mount Kangchenjunga circuit and those in the Mustang and Dhaulagiri Himal regions.

This makes the book appealing to both first-time visitors to Nepal and hardened trekkers who have already completed the popular classics.

Summary

While the book does a superb job providing background and information to trekkers, it falls short when it comes to climbing.

Though brief profiles of 12 of Nepal’s most popular “trekking peaks” are provided, they are really too superficial to be of value in planning a mountaineering trip.

Ultimately, a book like Nepal: Trekking and Climbing should do two things: Provide the basic information needed for the early planning of a trek and inspire travelers to pursue the trip of their dreams. This book does both, making it a valuable resource and an excellent addition to any trekker’s library.

Price: $13.60 | Buy

Giveaway: Win A Copy of The Andes: Trekking + Climbing!

Have a favorite photo that captures a memorable trek or climb you’ve taken? We want to see it!

In fact, we will be publishing our favorite shots provided in a photo essay on Matador Trips.

To win a copy of The Andes: Trekking + Climbing book which spotlights 26 classic treks and 18 classic climbs in the region,

1) Submit a link to one of your trekking or climbing photos in the comments below. You can upload your photos via Flickr.

2) Leave a short caption telling us the location and a little about your experience.

3) Complete this by Monday, May 11th, 11:59 PM EST

The Matador editors will pick their favorites for the photo essay and the standout shot will win the free book.