Traveling for cheap

The United States is finally getting a $65 European airfare.
Norwegian Airlines is establishing at least 10 new routes in the States. For instance, London-Austin, Tokyo-San Jose, Calif., and Edinburgh-Stewart International in Upstate N.Y. (60 miles north of New York City). The fares will begin at $65 a pop and there’s apparently several thousand available at that price. They’ll go up from there, the next tier being $99. [Bloomberg]

There’s a new start-up that will help you work and travel simultaneously.
Terminal 3, founded by a millennial former lawyer and current entrepreneur, is a new company that brings a group of freelancers together to visit a new city each month. They handle all the details — housing, office space, wifi — while you cover the destination for your contractor. [Forbes]

Great ideas from around the world

A Swedish lawmaker wants people to get paid for a one hour sex break with their partner.
The proposal is specifically happening in the northern town of Overtornea. Per Erik Muskos wants employers to pay their employees to go home and have some sex for one hour each week. Muskos believes this would not only make people happier and healthier, it would encourage some needed population growth. Sweden’s already known for its great ideas, like 480 days of paid paternal leave. [New York Post]

A nonprofit in Philadelphia is training citizens to peacefully disrupt immigration raids.
The New Sanctuary Movement is leveraging a policy that immigration raids will not happen in places of worship by using hymns and prayers as nonviolent disruptions. Citizens are being trained to call a hotline if they see ICE. That call triggers a text to all volunteers, who show up to the scene. Thirteen-hundred people have signed up and 500 have been trained, some of these volunteers are willing to risk an arrest for the cause. [NPR]

Protecting the environment

An entire island in American Samoa just switched from 100% diesel fuel to 100% solar power.
The population of Ta’U can be anywhere from 200 to 600 people, it varies with the time of year. The recent solar project took $8 million and was funded by the U.S. Department of Interior and the American Samoa Power Authority. It’s saving 110,000 gallons of diesel per year, plus the amount of fuel it took to deliver each shipment. [National Geographic]

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