Photo: Progress Ohio

Equal rights around the world

International Women’s Day is tomorrow but you may not see any women.
The first International Women’s Day happened in 1909 when 15,000 women marched through New York demanding voting rights, equal pay and shorter work hours. This year, women across the world will stay home from offices, stores and events in a general strike named A Day Without a Woman. If you’re a woman who is unable to participate, you can still wear red to show your solidarity. [USA Today]

Supporting diversity

Mexico is opening legal aid centers across the U.S. to enforce the human rights of Mexican immigrants.
These legal aid centers have already opened up at consulates in 50 cities across the U.S. to combat deportation. Legal counseling is free for any Mexican person living in the U.S. who feels their rights are being violated. According to the Pew Research Center, there are more than 6 million undocumented Mexicans living in the United States. [BBC]

Trump’s new Travel Ban will take effect on March 16.
This one is for six Muslim-majority countries (Iraq was taken off) and applies only to new visa applicants, not Green Card holders like before. About 60,000 people had their visas revoked under the previous ban, those people will now be able to enter the U.S. It’s still a 90-day ban on travelers entering the U.S. from the six listed countries and it’s still an indefinite ban on Syrian refugees entering the U.S. [Reuters]

Standing up for the environment

A guy filled a tram with 50,000 disposable coffee cups and then drove it through Melbourne.
The entire country of Australia drinks 50,000 cups of coffee every 30 minutes and therefore, more than 1 billion disposable coffee cups and lids end up on the street or in landfills each year. Melbourne is pretty much at the center of it all, being a huge coffee city. So Craig Reucassel, who is actually filming a three-part ABC series on waste right now, sent a tram through the city to remind everyone how wasteful disposable coffee cups really are. [Global Citizen]

It’s now possible to run Denmark on a 100 percent wind power.
The Danes tested a new wind power installation back in Feb. and successfully generated enough energy to run their entire country. On a windy day, the turbines generate 97 gigawatt-hours of power — enough to run 10 million average European homes. [Futurism]

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