Learning from the environment

Scientists are arguing about when the land bridge between North and South America showed up.
It’s been believed for a long time that the Panama land bridge emerged from the water some three million years ago, allowing plants and animals easier travel between the two continents. Scientists have been using the Isthmus of Panama to explain bizarre animal migrations and the emergence of extremely long ice ages. However, a vocal group of evolutionary biologists and geologists are stirring up an argument that it all actually happened 15 million years ago. A ‘fierce scientific battle’ has ensued. [Scientific American]

Our lead bullets and sinkers are poisoning bald eagles and other wildlife.
One of the last things President Obama did before leaving office was ban the use of lead ammunition and fishing tackle on federal land in order to protect wildlife. Biologists have been discovering bald eagles, among other wildfowl, with clear cases of lead poisoning — they’re disoriented, they have lime green vomit and diarrhea. However, some hunters are pressing President Trump to overturn this regulation because they believe it will make hunting more expensive. [NPR]

A Norwegian cruise line is planning an ocean conservation-themed tour.
Norwegian Escape is partnering with the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation to offer a sustainably-minded, educational cruise that’s focused on protecting our oceans. It leaves from Miami in October. In 2017, it’s pretty much the first of its kind. [Global Travel Media]

Being an activist

Hundreds showed up to protest fracking yesterday in Denver.
Six of the youth from Our Children’s Trust were there — the organization that is legally representing 21 young Americans in suing the federal government and various corporate entities (Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission included) for their role in climate change. [Denver Post]

Science activism is gaining a lot of momentum.
Hundreds of environmentalists and scientists gathered in Boston this past weekend on an unseasonable, 50-degree day to protest the Trump Administration’s climate change skepticism and its ‘direct attack’ on climate funding and research. This was the first science-focused march of Trump’s presidency, but it will not be the last. The March for Science will take place on Earth Day, April 22nd, in cities across the country. [The Guardian]

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For the nerdiest signs seen at the Boston Stand Up For Science rally, check these out.

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