Believing in science

Sen. Bernie Sanders sat down with Bill Nye the Science Guy to talk about solutions for climate change.
Bill claims that if we wanted to, we could run the entire world off of renewable resources. Right now. But to achieve that, we need people to come out of the woodwork to proclaim that they believe the science. He asks, “Who is the strongest environmentalist? The guy who just built his log cabin. Who is the strongest anti-smoker? The guy who just managed to quit.” How can we solve climate change? What will the world look like (soon) if we ignore it? If you do one thing today, watch this video.

The rise of strange technology

China has an airport security robot now.
It’s 5-feet tall, weighs 171 pounds, and has facial recognition technology, 4 HD cameras and the ability to shoot you with an electroshock weapon. [NPR]

Some genetic engineers at Harvard want to resurrect the wooly mammoth.
Which has spiraled into an effort to bring back and sustain a colony of extinct animals through genetic engineering. There are quite a few other scientists who believe the limited funding that supports conservation efforts could be better spent elsewhere. [Science Magazine]

Supporting diversity

A small town in Illinois is rallying behind a local undocumented immigrant.
West Frankfort, IL backed Donald Trump during the election, but today the town is pretty upset that Juan Carlos Hernandez Pacheco, a local restaurant owner, has been detained by ICE since Feb. 9th. Community members have organized a letter writing campaign, which both the mayor and police chief have participated in, claiming that Pacheco is a role model for their town. [ABC]

Strangers around the world have banded together to raise more than $1 million for the victims of last week’s fatal hate crime in Kansas.
Last Wednesday a man in Olathe, KS shot at two US-educated Indian men, killing one, after allegedly shouting, “Get out of my country!” Less than a week later, three separate GoFundMe accounts have raised a significant sum for the victims and their families. The money will go toward funeral and grieving costs, plus the cost of transporting the deceased Srinivas Kuchibhotla’s remains to India for a final burial ceremony. [NPR]

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