Sea World is finally ending its captive breeding program and the company’s 30 whales will be the last generation of SeaWorld orcas.

In collaboration with The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), and after having faced severe public criticism since the release of the 2013 documentary “Blackfish”, SeaWorld has decided to focus on the rescue and rehabilitation of marine mammals rather than on the breeding, training, and performance of killer whales.

Seaworld President and CEO Joel Manby explained in the HSUS press release:

“SeaWorld takes seriously its responsibility to preserve marine wildlife. As one of the largest rescue organizations in the world, we will increase our focus on rescue operations, so that the thousands of stranded marine mammals like dolphins and sea lions that cannot be released back to the wild will have a place to go.”

The live capture of orcas from the wild ended years ago and today SeaWorld reaffirmed that it is committed to keep this practice a thing of the past.

However, it is important to note that the 30 whales still living at SeaWorld will have to remain into their small tanks until their death, which can translate into decades since orcas can live up to 50 years and the youngest one is just one year-old.