1. We have our own language: Pittsburghese.

Yinz. Dippy eggs. Daahntahn. N’at. Jagoff. Progie. Sahside. Gumbands. Stillers. Buccos. Sammich.

“Umina ast yinz guys jest one last time.” If you don’t understand, you’re not from here.

2. We have Andy Warhol and Gene Kelly to be proud of.

The famous artist Andy Warhol called Pittsburgh his home, we even have a museum AND a bridge dedicated to him. But you also can’t forget about one of the most iconic actors of him Gene Kelly, known for acting in Singin’ in the Rain.

3. We yarn-bomb bridges here.

Andy Warhol’s bridge? Yeah we yarn-bombed it in August of 2013. Thanks in large part to a group that calls themselves “Knit the Bridge,” over 580 knitted and crocheted blankets were draped over and sewn together across the entire bridge. Andy Warhol would have been pleased.

4. The Strip District has freshly baked biscotti.

This is authentic Pittsburgh. Local stores and restaurants line The Strip. It’s heaven for foodies and brings a low key vibe for locals. Nothing compares to the fish markets, the fresh biscotti, and the roasted coffee beans that you can find in this part of town. It’s close enough to downtown to walk to, but far enough away to experience a different more authentic atmosphere.

5. The view from the Fort Pitt Bridge is unforgettable.

Pittsburgh has many great views, from the West End Overlook to the paths on the North Shore. However, every time I exit the Fort Pitt Tunnel and traverse the similarly named bridge, I lose my breath. From the Fort Pitt Bridge, Pittsburgh erupts into view with the fountain in Point State Park and Heinz Field to the left, and the US Steel Tower and PPG Place dominates the skyline.

6. You can walk anywhere in the City of Bridges.

Along with the Fort Bridge, we have 445 other bridges throughout the entire city. The best part about our bridges is that they’re built to be walkable. So whether you’re crossing the Roberto Clemente Bridge to get to a Pirate’s game or the 7th Street Bridge to get to the Andy Warhol Museum, you’re guaranteed to have a great view.

7. Our sports teams are better than yours.

Steelers. Pirates. Penguins. Riverhounds. We love our teams. In fact we’re crazy about them! The city awakens when any of our rivals come the Steel City and take on one of our beloved teams. Nothing brings out our passion more than dawning the good ol’ black and gold. We don’t mean to brag, but our Steelers do have 6 Super Bowl wins, how many does yours have?

8. We have an actual sports symbol called “the Terrible Towel.”

With our passion for sports comes the famous Terrible Towel. It was introduced during the 1975 playoffs by Myron Cope, a beloved former Steelers radio announcer. It brought the magic touch to an already exciting season by invigorating the Steelers’ victory over the Dallas Cowboys in the Super Bowl.

9. I can eat a Primanti Bros sammich 24/7.

We do food pretty well in Pittsburgh, and the Primanti Bros are no exception. A sandwich joint founded in 1933, the Primanti Bros originated in the Strip District. Their famous sandwich, the Pitts-burger, places a Pittsburgh cheesesteak, French fries, sweet & sour coleslaw, and tomatoes between two slices of Italian bread. On a scale of 1-Best Sammich Ever, the Primanti Brothers’ Pitts-burger Cheese Steak rivals that of the Philly cheesesteak.

10. Pittsburgh is the birthplace of the banana split.

Another great food invention, the banana split has called Pittsburgh its home since 1904. Invented by a 23-year old apprentice pharmacist, David Evans Strickler, in Latrobe, just south of Pittsburgh, it quickly gained popularity among college students. The rest is history.

11. The first injectable polio vaccine was developed at the University of Pittsburgh.

Not only are we known for our food, but Pittsburgh was also the first to develop an injectable polio vaccine in 1952. The virologist Jonas Salk spent years developing and testing his vaccine until it was ready for use in 1955. With an estimated 350,000 cases in 1988, polio has been decreased to only 223 cases worldwide in 2012. This paved the way for Pittsburgh to become an innovative center for the health industry.

12. Mr. Rogers, our favorite neighbor, lived his entire life here.

If you grew up in Pittsburgh and didn’t want to be Mister Rogers’ neighbor, there must have been something wrong with you. One of the most successful children’s shows, it brought educational television to a new standard. Fred Rogers created a world in which kids were enthralled by learning in the Land of Make Believe. Unfortunately for us, Mister Rogers died in 2003, two years after the final episode.

13. The Great Allegheny Passage connects us with the outdoors.

This 335 mile long trail starts in Pittsburgh and ends in Washington, DC. It’s a hike worth taking through forested valleys, little towns, and across rushing rivers. If you can’t take time off for the enter 335 miles, just pick a segment and spend the day out in nature.

14. We have more museums and culture than there is time in a day.

From the Carnegie Museum of Natural History to the Phipp’s Conservatory to the Benedum Center, if you’re like me — the culture and history of any location is always something to check out. You could see the Pittsburgh Symphony at Heinz Hall or check out the Carnegie Science Center across from Heinz Field. Countless options abound whether you’re looking for art, history, science, or theater.

15. We use ‘parking chairs’ to save spots for our cars.

Instead of driving around all day looking for a parking spot, we tend to play by different rules in Pittsburgh. Regardless of the weather, lawn chairs will be out and about, saving Pittsburghers their parking spots. It’s convenient. It’s simple. It’s the Pittsburgh way.

16. The potholes are few and the winter is mild.

Who are we kidding, Pittsburgh has potholes like crazy. And the weather? Don’t even get me started. Potholes and weather aside, Pittsburgh is a great city full of life and activity. Basically, it’s the best.