Last month, it seemed unfathomable that the coronavirus could slip into the back of anyone’s mind. But in response to the tragic death of George Floyd after a police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly nine minutes in Minneapolis on May 25, protests have erupted around the country and dominated our national conversation. Crowds of passionate protesters have been marching for over a week to express their anger over Floyd’s unjust killing. As of right now, protests have spread to all 50 US states, and 350 cities. And the demonstrations aren’t just confined to US soil.

Cities around the world are also showing their solidarity with US protests. On Sunday, crowds defied London’s lockdown rules and gathered in Trafalgar Square, marching in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. Some even marched to the US embassy in the Nine Elms area. Similarly, crowds in Berlin and Copenhagen gathered in front of their respective US Embassies holding Black Lives Matter placards and marching in extraordinary numbers.

In Milan, protesters took a different approach. A flash mob gathered in front of the US consulate, collectively sank to their knees, and held their hands to their throat in emulation of the now-famous “I can’t breathe” rallying cry. A similarly silent protest was staged in Dublin on Sunday, with 100 people standing in front of the US Embassy holding placards.

In Toronto and Vancouver, thousands of people marched against police brutality, chanting Black Lives Matter slogans and demanding justice for George Floyd. In Tokyo, protestors marched on May 30 in response to violent Tokyo police response against an ethnic Kurdish person in May. The latest protests also condemned the police killing of George Floyd.

The global demonstrations show that the rest of the world is watching, responding, and in solidarity. However, for those unable to protest, here’s how to support if you can’t be there in person.