On January 31st, Earth will be treated to a full moon total lunar eclipse for the first time in over 150 years. This event certainly has not generated the hype that last summer’s solar eclipse caused. It’s also happening in the middle of the night — a far less convenient time for most. But tonight’s event is sure to be worth viewing, especially if you happen to be on an island in the Pacific. No special eclipse sunglasses are necessary this time. Here’s the breakdown on what, when, and where.

What is going on?

Tonight’s event is what’s called a Total Lunar Eclipse. The moon will pass directly behind Earth, into what’s known as the Umbra. The sun, moon, and Earth will be perfectly aligned for a total eclipse. It’s called a Blue Moon because it falls on the second full moon of the month.

Where can you watch it?

The best spot to view the “Super Blue Blood Moon Eclipse” is in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Unless you’re currently on a cross-world sea voyage or an island in Oceania, tough luck there. That said, certain parts of the world will have better vantage points than others.

Great spots to be:

  • Oceania, eastern and central Asia, and Indonesia
  • New Zealand and Western Australia
  • Alaska, Hawaii, and much of Canada’s Northwest Territories

Still worth watching:

  • The rest of North and Central America. Generally, the further east you are on the North American continent, the less viewing time you’ll have.
  • Parts of Central and Southeast Asia

When is this happening?

Those in the Western Hemisphere should be prepared to wake up incredibly early (or pull an all-nighter). Here is the break down in Pacific Standard Time:

  • 3:48: Partial eclipse begins
  • 4:51: Total eclipse begins
  • 5:30: Mid-eclipse
  • 6:08: Total eclipse ends
  • 7:12: Partial eclipse ends

Taking photos tonight? Use #travelstoke on Instagram!

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