It’s official — the European Union will allow fully vaccinated Americans to travel to its 27 member states this summer.

On Sunday, the European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen told The New York Times that since Americans are using vaccines approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), they will be able to travel freely in the European bloc this summer.

“Because one thing is clear: All 27 member states will accept, unconditionally, all those who are vaccinated with vaccines that are approved by E.M.A.,” she said. The EMA has approved all three major vaccines, which are Moderna, Pfizer/BioNTech, and Johnson & Johnson. While the EU hasn’t set a fixed date for travel to resume, the expected timeline suggests June.

The United States is on track to reach herd immunity among the population by mid-June. Von der Leyen noted that this was “huge progress.” Vaccinated people will be able to travel by producing evidence of inoculation. The EU and the US are still working out the details of what a vaccine certificate might look like.

The EU is working on its own COVID-19 travel passes that would record proof of vaccination, negative test results, and recent history of COVID-19 recovery in order to facilitate movement as soon as possible.

Currently, Greece, Croatia, and Iceland are open to vaccinated US travelers. While each European nation will be able to set its own restrictions, the general consensus is that all 27 will accept inoculated travelers as the travel industry makes a push toward recovery.