Iceland is famous for many things, among them are volcanoes, natural hot springs, unique foods, scary Christmas traditions, and, of course, waterfalls. Some estimate that there are as many as 10,000 waterfalls in the country, all varying in sizes, shapes, and strength, but there’s one that is arguably more acclaimed than the rest of them: Seljalandsfoss waterfall.

@visit When in Iceland walking behind Seljalandsfoss waterfall is a must 🇮🇸 @brendinkelly #Seljalandsfoss #visiticeland #nature ♬ original sound – Ally Rendall

What makes Seljalandsfoss waterfall so notable isn’t its height (197 feet), the might of its flow, or its location, however impressive they all are. Instead, Seljalandsfoss waterfall is remarkable because you can go right behind it. A well-marked path leads visitor behind the cascade where they can witness its dramatic power from a different angle.

Despite being easy, walking behind Seljalandsfoss waterfall isn’t without danger so remember to slip on appropriate footwear and watch for slippery rocks. Make sure you wear waterproof gear, including a solid rain jacket, and have a change of clothes nearby because you’re likely to get wet from standing so close to the crashing waters.

Note that walking behind Seljalandsfoss isn’t an all-season endeavour. In late fall, winter, and early spring, ice may fall down and the path and the rocks are frozen and slippery, so only admire the waterfall from the front, well away from danger. If the path is closed, respect the signage for your own safety.

The best times to walk behind Seljalandsfoss is at sunset, when the light hits the water and turns the area in a warm shade of orange that makes for beautiful photographs. But before the daylight is gone, keep walking around the area to see the other beautiful waterfalls nearby, including the majestic Gljúfrafoss.

While the scenery surrounding Seljalandsfoss waterfall is dramatic and seems remote, it’s a popular tourist spot so there is a food stall, a gift shop, and clean porta-potties nearby. Seljalandsfoss waterfall is in South Iceland, just off Route 1 (also know as the Ring Road, the road that circles around the entire country), one hour and 45 minutes east of Reykjavík by car.