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12. Ta Prohm, Cambodia

Ta Prohm Temple, Cambodia

Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm is one of the many beautiful temples in the Angkor complex near Siem Reap, Cambodia. Its popularity comes from the ceiba and fig trees that are slowly reclaiming the centuries-old stonework.
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13. Bristlecone pine

Bristlecone Pine, Olmstead Point, Yosemite

Bristlecone pine

Dead bristlecone pine

Found mainly in the Great Basin of the American West, the resilient bristlecone pine is able to resist rot, insects, and severe weather. Some individuals are known to be more than 5,000 years old.
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14. Blue jacaranda

Blue jacaranda

Blue Jacaranda

Blue jacaranda

The blue jacaranda, found in South America, is known for its intense violet blooms. The tree has become a popular domesticated plant in much of the rest of the world.
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15. Ponderosa pines, Bryce Canyon National Park

Ponderosa Pines, Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Ponderosa pine, Bryce Canyon

These towering ponderosa pines — some up to 150 feet tall — grow in Ponderosa Canyon. Find them on the Agua Canyon Connecting Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park.
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16. Banyan trees

Arbol del Tule, Oaxaca, Mexico

Banyan Tree, Maui, Hawaii

Banyan Tree on Big Island, Hawaii

Slope Point, New Zealand

Banyan trees are actually types of figs that sprout within the cracks of other trees, causing them to eventually grow around and strangle the host. They’re found in many parts of the world — the first shot above is of the Arbol del Tule, a tree anywhere from 1,200 to 6,000 years old. Its trunk has the widest-known circumference in the world — 137 feet. The second and third trees are from Hawaii, and the windblown banyans in the final shot grow in New Zealand.
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17. Axel Erlandson’s art trees

Circus Trees, shaped by Axel Erlandson

Tree Circus

Tree Circus

Axel Erlandson

The strangest trees you’ll ever see were created by the Swedish-American farmer Axel Erlandson. Erlandson developed methods to get them to form in strange shapes, but never shared how he did it.
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18. Joshua trees

Joshua Trees, Red Rock Canyon, Nevada

Joshua Tree National Park

Sunset at Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California

The American Southwest’s famous Joshua trees are actually a type of yucca. They were named by Mormon pilgrims who thought they looked like the Biblical character Joshua with his arms outstretched to the sky.
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19. Pakistan’s spider trees

Spider trees, Pakistan

Spider trees, Pakistan

When wide-scale flooding hit Pakistan in 2010, spiders fleeing the rising waters took to the trees and cocooned them. National Geographic reported that these striking images came from the village of Sindh.
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20. Buttress roots

Costa Rica

Banyan Tree, Kauai, Hawaii

Black Roots on Red Leaves

These roots are known as “buttress roots,” and they can be found on many different species of tree. They usually form in nutrient-poor soils, and so do not go particularly deep into the ground, which forces them to bulk up in order to keep the trees from falling down.
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21. Japanese maple

Japanese Maple in Portland, Oregon

Japanese maple

Japanese maple

Japanese maples are native to East Asia, but this beautiful autumn maple grows in Portland, Oregon.
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